HOW TO GROW THE CALIFORNIAN POPPY


The Californian poppy - Eschscholzia californica, is a popular hardy annual native to the United States and Mexico, and is the official state flower of California. It is a dwarfing in habit, has finely cut blue-green leaves, and will grow to between 10 and 50 centimetres in height. It is particularly suitable for garden edging and for rock gardens although it may become invasive overtime.

The Californian poppy is notable for its bright, orange-yellow blooms which are borne in profusion atop of long stalks from June to October. The flowers are saucer-shaped, approximately 3 inches long and followed by 3-4 inch long, blue-green cylindrical seed pods one pollinated. The flowers of the Californian poppy have an interesting habit as the petals are able to open and close depending on the time of day or weather conditions. They will close at night or in cold, windy weather, and will sometimes remain closed in low light levels such as cloudy weather.

They will perform best in poor sandy soils, in a sunny position. They are also suitable for exposed or coastal areas. Like many annuals, if you deadhead the flowers to prevent the seed pods from forming you will encourage further blooms. However this can end up being a rather labour intensive performance.

Californian poppies are easy to grow from seed and can be sown in either September or March in their permanent position outside. September sown stock may require the protection of a cloche over winter unless the site is sheltered and well drained.

 If you are growing the Californian poppy for cut flowers then the stems should be removed from the parent plant at bud stage.

For related article click onto the following links:
Buy Blue Poppy Seeds
How to Grow the Californian Poppy
HOW TO GROW CLADANTHUS ARABICUS
HOW TO GROW THE HIMALAYAN BLUE POPPY
HOW TO GROW THE HIMALAYAN BLUE POPPY - Meconopsis betonicifolia - FROM SEED
Meconopsis betonicifolia
THE CALIFORNIAN POPPY- Eschscholzia californica
THE ORIENTAL POPPY - Papaver orientale

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