TULIPA ACUMINATA

Tulipa acuminata




Tulipa acuminata - more commonly known as the 'Fire Flame' tulip or 'Turkish' tulip, is a rare find, yet it is well worth the effort if you can get hold of some. Arguably the most unusual of all species tulips, it dates back to the early 1700's and the Ottoman Empire.

Tulipa acuminata
This unusual flower shape was extremely popular during the days of Empire with a number of similar cultivars in production. In fact there is still evidence of these varieties in old, painted wall tiles.

Turkish merchants transported species bulbs and their cultivars to the rich markets of western Europe. The Dutch, for a time, valued these plants more than gold itself!

Sadly, almost all of these beautiful and historic flame-like tulips have disappeared, as today only Tulipa acuminata exists, and only in commercial production. Even this last variety has disappeared from its native habitat.

Should you wish to purchase Tulipa acuminata you are unlikely to see among the varieties on display in you local plant retailer. Instead you will need to trawl through the online retailers and even then will often find it out of stock.

Availability is seasonal but now is the best time. If you want one, and you see one, then buy it there and then because it won't be around for long!

To find out how to grow this plant in you garden you can click onto the following link:

http://gardenofeaden.blogspot.co.uk/2009/01/old-dutch-tulips-tulipa-acuminata.html

For related articles click onto the following links:
DO BLACK TULIPS REALLY EXIST?
How to Grow Species Tulips from Seed
HOW TO GROW TULIPS
HOW TO OVERWINTER RARE AND SPECIES TULIPS
HOW TO PLANT TULIPS
LOST TULIPS OF THE DUTCH GOLDEN AGE - SEMPER AUGUSTUS AND THE VICEROI
OLD, BROKEN, AND UNUSUAL DUTCH TULIP VARIETIES
SPECIES TULIP - Tulipa acuminata
SPECIES TULIP - Tulipa Wilsoniana
Top Tips for Tulip Care
TULIPA ACUMINATA
TULIP HISTORY AND POPULAR VARIETIES
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TULIP ‘SEMPER AUGUSTUS’ - DOES IT STILL EXIST?
WHAT IS THE TULIP BREAKING VIRUS?

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