THE SECRETS TO GROWING BONSAI





All photographs are reproduced with the kind permission of Peter Chan

If you want to know how to grow bonsai then you really can't do better than to ask Peter Chan, owner of Britain's premier Bonsai nursery - Herons Bonsai.

Peter Chan is the author of eight books on the subject and a winner of no less that  21 Chelsea Flower Show Gold Medals (a feat that no other bonsai specialist has managed to achieve). I doubt that there is anything that Peter Chan doesn't know about his specialized subject .


Luckily for me, I had the pleasure of an unexpected meeting with Peter at his bonsai nursery in Surrey, England. I say lucky because Peter spends a fair amount of his time travelling the globe either procuring bonsai, or promoting bonsai to the world. Therefore, the chances of seeing the great man at his home at Herons Bonsai can be rather slim!

After deciding to visit Herons Bonsai in order to find a pot the exact shade of blue that the future Mrs. Eade had decided on, I managed to meet up with Peter near his landscaped Japanese 'Stroll garden'.

After introductions, I was blessed with a private tour of the inner workings of the nursery. It was time to glean the secrets of growing bonsai from the best mind in the country.

The first surprise I came across was that all the Acer species of bonsai were produced on site at the nursery making Herons Bonsai completely self sufficient for stock of this family of plants. How does Peter achieve this? Well of course, propagation through seed and cuttings will account for all the small stock, but what about the decent number of larger specimens.

Even though Peter has been producing Bonsai at Herons since 1986, the only realistic way that he could have built up such a large and varied selection of mature specimens would have been by not selling any of them  - which is of course ridiculous. So how does he do it?

The first secret

Air layering on Acers
Peter Chan is able to produce a large number of high quality, interesting stock by using the propagation technique of 'air layering'.

Air layering is a propagation technique by where a section of branch is encouraged to break in to adventitious roots.

Adventitious roots are those which arise out of sequence from the more usual root formation, and instead originate from the stem, branches, leaves, or old woody roots.

Air layering is executed by wounding a section the stem with a sterilised blade where the roots are required to form. If necessary, a dusting of rooting hormone powder can be applied to these wounds in order to encourage the adventitious roots to initiate.

Air layering on hornbeam
Wrap the wounded stem section loosely with plastic, sealing it at one end with some weather-proof adhesive tape

Pack the wrapping sleeve with a moist rooting medium to a thickness of 3-4 inches. The rooting medium is then secured in place using clear plastic.

The rooting medium should always provide aeration and a constant supply of moisture. Peter Chan prefers to use sphagnum moss.


Leave the wrapping in place for up to a year, and check it occasionally for signs of rooting.

When strong new roots are visible through the moss, remove the plastic sleeve. Cut through the stem just below the rooted section

Once sufficient root has been produced, a cut can be made below the adventitious roots, and this new plant can be potted on until it is large enough to plant outside


By carefully selecting interesting branch formations Peter Chan is able to produce the foundation of a new specimen in a traditional bonsai style.

This saves years on trying to produce stock by seed or cuttings, plus you have the advantage of an instant, mature plant.

Peter Chan also uses this technique on hornbeam, and on rare occasions beech.

The second secret

Carpinus species growing in sphagnum moss
In order to produce vigorous root growth in poorly specimens - or specimens that that need to be deliberately accelerated, Peter Chan doesn't use anything as pedestrian as potting compost.

Instead, these bonsai's are potted on into a medium made up entirely of sphagnum moss - which is of course sterile.

Therefore, all the plants nutrients are supplied using a liquid feed and these bonsai's will remain in sphagnum moss for up to two years before being potted on to a more commercial compost mix.

The third secret

Copper wire embedded in pine
Most growers of bonsai will use copper or aluminium wire to help guide the shape of their bonsai.

They will also remove or replace them as the plants branches increase in size.

Peter Chan's method is leave the wire in place and allow the trees bark to grow and callous over the wires forming a pleasing, gnarled effect.

Just be aware that there are no short cuts to this effect, and you can expect it to take a number of years to come to fruition.

The fourth secret

This may seem obvious, but correct watering is paramount to producing a high quality bonsai. Too much and your bonsai will die. Too little and again your bonsai will die.

The root balls of bonsai are deliberately cropped in order to induce the environmental stress that helps the 'miniaturization' of the plant.

Peter Chan, the future Mrs. Eade and baby George
It is this miniaturization that typifies the bonsai style. The problem is that these small root balls are prone to drying out as they can only hold a limited amount of water.

With this in mind you will probably find that during the growing season your bonsai will need watering almost every day, and during the peak of summer this will probably need to increase to twice a day. You may wish to move you bonsai to a shaded, sheltered area under these circumstances to reduce the risk of drying out.

Underestimating this will result in leaf drop as your bonsai reacts to environmental shock. Of course try not to make things worse by leaving you bonsai in a bucket of water for a few days to compensate as this will quickly kill off what was left of your bonsai's root system.

Of course, there is so much more to learn from Peter Chan than time would allow. However, you can find out more by reading his best selling book:

 Bonsai Secrets: Designing, Growing And Caring for Your Miniature Masterpieces

If you would like to find out more about Peter Chan and Heron Bonsai then you can visit his website from this linkhttp://www.herons.co.uk/

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THE ADVANTAGES OF AN OUTDOOR STORAGE SHED


The advantages of an outdoor storage shed.

What is the very most useful thing to have in your backyard, apart from the requisite washing line, greenery, and backyard fence? That's right, it's a shed. The little old shed has so many different and important uses. If you don't have one, you don't know what you're missing out on.

  • Ever been forced into a storage space ultimatum? Keep one or the other, you can't keep both? No room for the pair of them one of the has to be thrown out? Ever been at a yard sale or in a hardware or furniture store and seen something that you really want, and think that you could have made use of, but been nagged by the worry of where you would keep it? Well, with an outdoor shed, those worries are eliminated.

  • Building or designing your own shed in consultation with a shed specialist like Steelchief is a great thing to do, because you can choose exactly what kind of shed you want, and design it to your needs. Having your shed built by a professional ensures that it is built properly, and that it adheres to safety standards and council regulations.

  • Your shed can contain a tool locker, which will keep your most used tools easily accessible.

  • You can add windows or a pergola extension to a part of your shed and have it double as an outdoor sitting area from one end.

  • Keep things that smell, like fertiliser and teak oil polish well away from the house but still safe and protected.
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WHAT IS POISON OAK?







For most Europeans, the poison oak is a bit of a mystery. We hear about it in popular American television programs, but this only causes confusion as there is no such thing as poison oak in Europe - should we be worried?

No, luckily for us, poison oak is a deciduous shrub native only to North America, and is found widespread throughout the mountains and valleys of California. It thrives in shady canyons and riparian habitats, and commonly grows as a climbing vine with aerial (adventitious) roots that adhere to the trunks of oaks and sycamores.

If you are sensitive to the effects of poison oak - and over half the population of the United States are - you can develop an itchy, blistering rash by coming into contact with these plants.

The rash is caused by contact with an oil - urushiol, which is present in all parts of the plant, including the leaves, stems, flowers, berries, and roots.

Urushiol is an allergen, so the rash is actually an allergic reaction to the oil in the poison oak.

Indirect contact with urushiol can also cause the rash. This may happen when you touch clothing, pet fur, sporting gear, gardening tools, or other objects that have come in contact with one of these plants. But urushiol does not cause a rash on everyone who gets it on his or her skin.

The rash usually appears 8 to 48 hours after your contact with the urushiol. But it can occur from 5 hours to 15 days after touching poison oak. The rash usually takes more than a week to show up the first time you get urushiol on your skin. But the rash develops much more quickly (within 1 to 2 days) after later contacts. The rash will continue to develop in new areas over several days but only on the parts of your skin that had contact with the urushiol or those parts where the urushiol was spread by touching.

The rash is not contagious. You cannot catch or spread a rash after it appears, even if you touch it or the blister fluid, because the urushiol will already be absorbed or washed off the skin. The rash may seem to be spreading. But either it is still developing from earlier contact or you have touched something that still has urushiol on it.

The more urushiol you come in contact with, the more severe your skin reaction. Severe reactions to smaller amounts of urushiol also may occur in people who are highly sensitive to urushiol. Serious symptoms may include:

Swelling of the face, mouth, neck, genitals, or eyelids (which may prevent the eyes from opening).
Widespread, large blisters that ooze large amounts of fluid.

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Based on an article from http://www.webmd.com/allergies/tc/poison-ivy-oak-or-sumac-topic-overview
Images care of http://www.pesticide.org/solutions/phase-2-solutions-for-consumers/poison-oak-and-ivy

WHAT IS GOUT?






When we think of gout, images of Henry VIII, and the books of Charles Dickens come to mind. Like typhoid, Gout is a disease that is now confined to the history books, an illness the result of an age of ignorance and squalor. But you would be wrong, people all over the world today still suffer from this painful illness which is almost a direct result of our modern, and often stressful lifestyles.

It turns out that gut is a type of arthritis, in which crystals of sodium urate produced by the body can form inside your joints.

The most common symptom of gout is sudden and severe pain in the joint, along with swelling and redness.

Strangely, the joint of the big toe is usually affected, but gout can develop in any joint.

Symptoms can develop rapidly to their worst point in 6-24 hours and usually last for 3-10 days (this is sometimes known as a gout attack). After this time, the joint will start to feel normal again and any pain or discomfort should eventually disappear completely.

Most people with gout will have further attacks in the future.

What causes gout?

Gout is caused by a build-up of uric acid in the blood. Uric acid is a waste product made in the body every day and excreted mainly via the kidneys. It forms when the body breaks down chemicals in the cells known as purines.

If you produce too much uric acid or excrete too little when you urinate, the uric acid builds up and may cause tiny crystals to form in and around joints.

These hard, needle-shaped crystals build up slowly over several years. You will not know this is happening.

The crystals may cause two problems:

Some may spill over into the soft lining of the joint (synovium), which causes the pain and inflammation associated with gout.

Some pack together to form hard, slowly expanding lumps of crystals (“tophi”) which can cause progressive damage to the joint and nearby bone; this eventually leads to irreversible joint damage which causes pain and stiffness when the joint is being used.

Factors which increase your risk of gout include:

Age and gender. Gout is more common when you get older and is three-to-four times more likely in men.

Being overweight or obese.

Having high blood pressure or diabetes.

Having close relatives with gout (gout often runs in families).

Having long-term kidney problems that reduce the elimination of uric acid.

Having a diet rich in purines; such as frequently eating sardines and liver.

Drinking too much beer or spirits – these types of alcoholic drinks contain relatively high levels of purines.

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Images care of http://alisonweir.org.uk/books/bookpages/more-henry-viii.asp and http://whatisgout.net/how-to-answer-what-is-gout/ and http://www.adn-creation.net/gout/tylenol-for-gout-pain/ and http://www.123rf.com/photo_13109556_fat-man-eating-hamburger-seated-on-armchair.html

HOW TO GROW ASPARAGUS



Although considered by many as a gourmet vegetable, the asparagus is often over looked as a garden crop. This is a real shame as shop bought, imported varieties really don’t have the same sublime flavour as quality home-grown produce.

Luckily, asparagus are a fairly simple crop once you have got them going. However, it is all in the preparation and this is where you do need to put the work in - in making an asparagus bed. Before you start though you need to decide whether to grow your own stock from seed or purchase 1-2 year old stock from your local plant centre.

How to make an asparagus bed

You can start preparing new asparagus beds as early as the autumn. They are happy in most soil types provided they are well drained, but if you are stuck with a heavy clay soil then you may wish to consider planting them into raised beds.

Dig in plenty of well rotted manure and if your soil is particularly acid you may also need to add lime. Asparagus prefer a pH of between 6.5 and 7.5. Remove all perennial weeds from the start as they will compete against the growth of your crop later on.

If you are using a traditional trench system you will need to dig it out to 1 foot wide and 8 inches deep, adding well-rotted farm manure to the bottom of the trench.

Next, cover the manure with a couple of inches of the excavated soil and make a small ridge of no more than 4 inches along the bottom of the trench. Place the crowns on top, spacing them 12-18 inches apart.

Leave 18 inches between rows and stagger the plants if you are short of space.

Spread the roots evenly and fill in the trench leaving the bud tips just visible. Water in and mulch with a couple of inches of well-rotted manure.

Asparagus beds will need a certain amount of maintenance and must be kept weed free. This is best done by hand as asparagus plants have shallow roots which can be easily damaged by hoeing.

Keep an eye on high winds as your valuable asparagus plants can easily have their stems damaged which will reduce your plants vigour for next years crop. This would mean that you would end up with less spears.

Also keep an eye out for berrying female stems which - if their seeds turn red, ripen and fall amongst your rows can germinate and muscle out the productive male varieties and again reducing the amounts of spears produced the following year.

If you see these tell-tale female stems then cut them off at the base before their seeds ripen.

In subsequent years mulch the asparagus beds with well-rotted manure after harvesting. Not only will this help the plants develop strong healthy fronds to support valuable root growth, it will also help to keep down the incidence of weeds.

How to grow asparagus from seed

When buying asparagus plants for a newly created asparagus bed, most plant retailers will only offer a small range of one or two year old plants. Although they will always look healthy in the pots, there is always a risk of failure when it comes to transplanting - around 10%-15% for one year old stock and as high as 20% for 2 year old stock. When paying full retail prices - particularly with regards to 2 year old stock - this can end up being an expensive lesson.

Asparagus seeds
Growing asparagus from seed - either in pots or directly into the beds - gives the best viability, with a survival rate of around 100%.

In addition, with direct sowing there is no transplanting or root shock to delay valuable root development.

The best time to sow asparagus seeds is around mid-April when the ground is warm enough to initiate germination. A good tip is to soak the seeds in water for a couple of hours before planting.

You will find that this will help to speed up the germination process considerably.

Direct sowing

Once the bed has been prepared raked over the top layer into a fine tilth, then sow the seed into thin rows down to a depth of about 2 inches.

Depending on how many plants you intend cropping each subsequent row should be between 12 and 18 inches apart. Water them in well if conditions are dry.

The new seedlings should emerge in about 3 weeks, and as soon as they are large enough they can be thinned out to about 2in apart. Then, once the seedlings reach about 6 inches high, they can be thinned out again to around 18 inches apart. For the rest of the year you just need to keep the beds weeded and the plants well-watered.

If you have bought seed varieties that produce both male and female plants, you will need to remove any female forms as soon as they become identifiable - normally from their berries.

Sowing indoors
.
Some asparagus varieties like the popular 'Connovers Colossal' are best sown indoors and this can be done any time between February and March. Again, try soaking them for a couple of hours, then plant them into individual pots containing moist John Innes seed compost. Place them in a warm room at approximately 15-18 degrees Celsius then, once germinated, move to to a cool, light area such as a windowsill, but keep them out of direct sunlight.

Once the threat of frosts are over they will need to be gradually accustomed to conditions outside - this known as 'hardening off' and can take between 2-3 weeks. Once they are ready to be moved out into the asparagus bed proper, they can to be planted fairly deeply leaving a couple of inches of soil above the level of the compost. Keep them nicely watered over the summer period and - as always - keep the bed free of weeds, especially perennial weeds which will compete with your seedlings roots for nutrients.

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Images care of http://worcsterallotment.blogspot.co.uk/2010/04/asparagus-we-can-afford.html and http://www.eatlivegrowpaleo.com/2012/07/vegetables-asparagus.html

HOW TO GROW ROSEMARY FROM CUTTINGS



Rosemary is one of those plants that not only smells good, it tastes good and looks good too. When I say taste, I mean as a flavoursome herb so don’t start chomping on a random stem and expect it to fill you with culinary delights – because it won’t!

Be that as it may, rosemary plants are fantastically popular and are often found in gardens as a specimen shrub or informal hedging. Its Latin name, Rosmarinus officinalis, means "dew of the sea" and while rosemary is most closely associated with Mediterranean cooking you don't need perfect sunshine, or a sea mist to successfully grow rosemary.

How to propagate Rosemary from cuttings

The best time to take cuttings from Rosemary is when the new shoots begin to emerge. Mid to late June is normally the best time. Select a healthy looking plant with lots of new growth on it. If you can, take your cuttings early in the day.

Using a sterilised sharp blade or secateurs, snip off non-flowering sections of new growth 10cm - 15cm long. To reduce moisture loss, remove most of the lower leaves so you have a clean length of stem and place them in a plastic bag. Seal it and keep it in a shaded spot to prevent wilting until you are ready to root the cuttings.

Using porous terracotta pots fill with a good quality cutting compost such as John Innes ‘Seed and Cutting’. However, I would recommend improving the drainage by mixing in horticultural grit or perlite at a ratio of 2:1 compost to drainage improver.

Once again, using a sharp sterilised knife, take 7.5cm (3in) cuttings from young shoots either just below a leaf joint or torn off at the stem. Remove the leaves from the lower half of the cutting in order to help reduce water loss.

At this point you can dip the stem ends in hormone rooting powder to speed up the rooting process, but this isn't really necessary.

The rosemary cuttings can now be inserted around the edge of the pot – if the pot is big enough – leaving a 1 ½ inch gap between each cutting. Alternatively – if your pots are on the small side – plant the cuttings individually.

Water the cuttings from below and allow the compost to settle around their stems. Place pots in a cold frame in a sheltered, shaded area, indoors in a propagator or simply cover with a plastic bag to retain the moisture. Just make sure that the sides of the bag are not touching any of the plant material.

After a few weeks, gently invert pots and check for signs of root development. Mist over foliage and ensure the compost stays on the moist side. Once new growth begins to appear all covers can be removed. Allow the soil to dry out between watering but don’t allow the compost to stay dry for extended periods and do not allow the compost to become waterlogged.

Once the rosemary cuttings have a good root system, gently tease the cuttings apart and pot up individually into a loam-based compost, such as John Innes No. 2.

Keep plants watered and pot them on again as they get larger and the roots fill their container. They should be big enough to plant out in the following spring.

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Based on an article by  http://gardening.about.com/od/vegetablepatch/a/Rosemary.htm
Photo care of http://www.gardenersworld.com/how-to/projects/rosemary-cuttings/ and http://www.gardenaction.co.uk/fruit_veg_diary/fruit_veg_mini_project_july_3_rosemary.asp and

FOUR UNUSUAL GREEN IDEAS FOR YOUR CONSERVATORY


There are some very good environmentally friendly reasons for choosing a conservatory which you are probably already well aware of. These rooms are great at heating up a house naturally and can also give you a perfect space to add some plants to your home. However, there are also some more unusual green ideas for conservatories which you might not have come across yet.

Less Food Miles on Tropical Fruits

Did you know that conservatories first became popular in the UK and other parts of Northern Europe largely due to a fascination with growing oranges and other tropical fruits? 

This is why some models of conservatories – such as a number of those offered by Anglian Home Improvements  – are also called orangeries. These days most of us buy our tropical fruits from a supermarket but this means that they have travelled round the world and clocked up a huge number of food miles along the way. 


Using your conservatory like they did in the old days is a fantastically green solution to having exotic fruits any time you want them.


No More Tumble Dryer

We all know that our home appliances are among the biggest energy users in our house but what would we do without them?  There are few of us who like the idea of having to wash our clothes by hand like in the old days or of living without a freezer. However, one of the biggest consumers of energy in your property is likely to be your tumble dryer. The average UK household pays out around £37 a year for the energy this machine uses and it typically produces more carbon dioxide in a year then your microwave, washing machine and dishwasher put together. A simple way to use less energy is to hang your damp clothes out in your warm conservatory and let them dry naturally.

Work from Home in Winter

Commuting to work each day is another way in which many of us produce more of a negative impact on the planet than we would like to do. 

Working from home is a partial solution but in winter time it can mean turning up the heating in your home for a lot longer than usual. 


A nice way round this is to set up your home office in your conservatory.


Here you can enjoy some peace and quiet and be kept warm while enjoying a view of the garden as well.


Recycle Your Old Furniture

Most conservatories look best with rustic furniture or antique pieces. If you have some older pieces which you don’t know what to do with then moving them into the conservatory can be a much better idea than throwing them out. It is usually best to go for a fairly sparse look in here rather than make it too crowded but there should still be room to recycle a few pieces of furniture and make good use of them. 

The article is written in association with www.anglianhome.co.uk

MASHED POTATO






It may sound little strange but father had an absolute love of mashed potato. Not only was it a dish that he took great pride in creating, he also believed that a great pile of it would cure a hangover if enough was eaten!

His obsession may well be due to his farming family background who predominately grew parsnips and potatoes in the Spey bay region of Scotland. All I know is that Dads mashed potato was excellent.

Getting the right potato

The trouble is that potatoes nowadays just don't have the flavour. Typically floury and flavourless, supermarket potatoes just don't make the grade. Don't believe me, then try cooking up some home-grown or allotment potatoes, the difference will surprise you.

My favourite variety is 'Pink fir Apple'. The trouble is that the yields are poor, but the flavour is second to none! I even cook it with the skin left on - make sure you wash it thoroughly first.

Of course, soil conditions will vary depending on where you live, so if you decide to grow your own potatoes talk to local growers to find the best performing varieties.

How to make mashed potatoes

The main ingredients for mashed potato are as follows:

Potatoes
Salt
Pepper
Milk
Butter - good quality not cheap own brand.

If you are on a diet then loose the butter. If you need fattening up then you can add grated mature cheese and or double cream. If you are posh then add or just top with chopped parsley or chives.

Put simply, peel or not peel the potatoes - depending on your preference - and boil them for approximately 15 minutes in a suitably sized saucepan. Don't over cook them as they will turn into a horrible wet mush when you mash them.

When the potatoes are near to being cooked, test them with a table knife. If the knife doesn't go into the potato then it isn't ready. If the knife slides in comfortably  then it is cooked and ready for mashing. If the knife slides in and the potato begins to fall apart then it is too late - your potatoes are over cooked you Muppet so pay attention for next time!

Using a colander  drain the water off. Once it has stopped dripping place the potatoes back into the hot saucepan. Add a nob of butter, a drop of milk to improve the consistency and a touch of salt and pepper.

Mash the mix with a potato masher. Once all of the lumps have gone taste test the mix and add more of any ingredients that you feel are lacking. Mash it once more and serve. Enjoy, and don't forget to add lashings of thick gravy.


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Images care of http://trickstreatsyummyeats.blogspot.co.uk/2011/07/mashed-potato-tips.html and http://www.internationalsupermarketnews.com/news/7511

HOW TO GROW WISTERIA




Wisteria are one of the most floriferous and coveted of all climbers. And because they are normally purchased as grafted stock they are also one of the most expensive.

With that in mind you will want to get the most out of yours and if you get the pruning right your wisteria really will flower its heart out.

Where to plant wisteria

Wisteria will grow freely in almost any soil.

The ideal is a moist, rich, medium loam, but where this is not available, prepare a planting site that will give plenty of room for root growth.

The flower buds are susceptible to damage from late frosts or cold winds.

With that in mind, they will need the protection of a south or west facing wall - particularly in positions where where early morning sun follows the frost.

Plant out young pot grown plants from October to March in temperate weather. Provide a permanent  support, and tie the young growths to it until the twining stems can gain a firm hold


How to grow wisteria

Excessive fertilizer, in particularly nitrogen can cause your blooms to fail. Wisteria has nitrogen producing  bacteria in root nodules, and while mature plants may benefit from added potassium and phosphate, they will perform poorly with to much nitrogen.

Be aware that if your wisteria is seed grown and not from grafted stock it can be reluctant to bloom if it has not reached maturity. Maturation may require only a few years, as in Kentucky Wisteria, or nearly twenty, as in Chinese Wisteria.

Maturation can be forced by physically damaging the main trunk - but not too much, root pruning, or drought stress.

Wisteria can grow into a mound when unsupported, but is at its best when allowed to climb up a tree, pergola, wall, or other supporting structure.

Whatever the case, the support must be sturdy, because mature Wisteria can become heavy with wrist-thick trunks and stems. These will certainly break apart latticework, crush thin wooden posts, and can even strangle large trees. Furthermore, be careful when allowing wisteria to grow on the sides of houses. They can cause damage to gutters, down pipes, and similar structures.

How to prune wisteria

However, when it comes to pruning, wisteria is unlike other plants. Why? Because where as most plants get pruned just the once, wisteria will need pruning twice a year. Once in July or August, and then again in January or February.

Summer pruning 

At this time of year cut back the whippy green shoots of the current year’s growth to five or six leaves after flowering in July or August.

This controls the size of the wisteria, preventing it getting into guttering and windows, and encourages it to form flower buds rather than green growth.

Winter pruning 

Cut back the same growths to two or three buds in January or February  when the plant is dormant and leafless.

This tidies it up before the growing season starts and ensure the flowers will not be obscured by leaves.

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Based on an article from http://apps.rhs.org.uk/advicesearch/profile.aspx?pid=516
Based on an article from http://www.rhs.org.uk/Gardening/Help-advice/Videos/Pruning-wisteria-winter and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wisteria
Images care of http://apps.rhs.org.uk/advicesearch/profile.aspx?pid=242 and http://sun-surfer.com/wisteria-tunnel-kawachi-fuji-garden-kitakyushu-japan-982.html and http://www.flickr.com/photos/14662964@N08/3659178807/