HOW TO GROW THE JADE VINE

The Jade vine - http://drawnassociation.net/




The jade vine - Strongylodon macrobotrys originates from the tropical rainforests of the Philippines, a scattered group of 7100 islands in tropical Asia. As such it is not frost-tolerant, and will need a minimum temperature of 15°C (59°F). they do not have a rest period over winter.

Jade vine - http://www.fairchildgarden.org/
Because of its potentially large size it needs to be grown over a substantial support such as a sturdy pergola, this also helps to display the spectacular cascading flower trusses which are produced generously once the vine is mature. This can be 2 years or more, depending on pruning regime.

They prefer to be grown in full sun and and in a slightly acidic soil. A rich, peat-based potting soil with excellent drainage is will give the best results.

The drainage is very important as the jade vine requires copious amounts of water all year round. Lack of water will cause leaf-browning and slow and stunted growth.

The vines quickly mature if you prune them every three months or so. The flowers can be encouraged to form by pruning. Choose a new shoot of purple leaves on a mature vine no less than 1/2 inch thick.

If you are growing you jade vine in a pot, you should ideally grown in the largest container possible, to minimize the need to repot further. Once the vine is established, instead of re-potting, change the surface soil once a year or so by scrapping out old soil and replacing the top few inches of soil. Smaller plants, before they become climbers, can be repotted annually.

Jade vine - http://www.naturepicoftheday.com/
Jade vines are not particularly susceptible to pests, but can be affected by mealybugs, aphids, and mites.

Signs of infestation include tiny webs on plants, clumps of a white, powdery residue, or visible insects on the plant.

Treat infestations as soon as possible to prevent them from spreading to the rest of your collection.

In colder climates the plant must be grown in a large glasshouse or conservatory, and if you want the flowers to fruit they will need to be pollinated by hand.

For related articles click onto the following links:
HELICONIA ROSTRATA - The Lobster Claw Plant
HOW TO GROW HELICONIA ROSTRATA
HOW TO GROW THE JADE VINE
HOW TO GROW THUNBERGIA MYSORENSIS - The Indian Clock vine
THE JADE VINE
THUNBERGIA MYSORENSIS - The Indian Clock vine

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