CLEMATIS montana 'Grandiflora'

CLEMATIS montana 'Grandiflora'


If you ignore the blousy, old fashioned clematis hybrids, Clematis montana 'Grandiflora' has got to be one of the most impressive flowering climbing plants that money can buy. It is certainly a favourite of the future Mrs. Eade, and it sits 'pride of place' in her blue and white garden.

A recipient of the prestigious RHS Award of Garden merit, Clematis montana 'Grandiflora' produces dazzling, clear white from late spring to early summer.

CLEMATIS montana 'Grandiflora'
Its very hardy in nature and makes it perfect for exposed sites, such as the coastal garden that we posses.

Like all early-flowering clematis, it requires little pruning other than to tidy its habit and remove any dead or damaged growth after flowering.

It has been known for mature specimens to suddenly die off for no apparent reason. This is usually due to a condition called slime flux, caused by an injury to the stem early in the season. This occurs when sap leaks out and becomes infected with bacteria. You must act quickly by cutting out infected stems, and pruning back to good wood - even if this involves going down to ground level!

Surprisingly, the species name 'montana' has nothing to do with the American state Montana, located on its north-western border. In fact, Clematis montana is a native to the Himalayas.

It was discovered in 1818 and was introduced to European gardens in 1831 by the Countess of Amherst.

Growing to a height of up to 40 feet, this deciduous and vigorous species is one of the easiest flowering climbers to grow.

CLEMATIS montana 'Grandiflora'
It tends to produce upright leaders at first, but then they begin to branch out nearer the top. They can be planted during suitable weather any time between October and May, preferably in an alkaline soil.

Clematis montana need to be kept in an open position, but one which also shades the base of the plant and the roots from strong sun. A confliction of course, so consider under-planting the clematis in order to produce the desired effect.

Clematis are generally self supporting, but they will need some kind of framework to hold onto. Young growth may need to be tied in from time time to time to keep the plant tidy, and give an annual mulch with a well rotted manure.

For related articles click onto:
CLEMATIS CIRRHOSA species and cultivars
Clematis florida 'Sieboldii'
CLEMATIS MONTANA - The Anemone Clematis
CLEMATIS montana 'Grandiflora'
CLEMATIS MONTANA var. grandiflora
Clematis 'Nelly Moser'
CLEMATIS 'NELLY MOSER'
HOW TO GROW CLEMATIS ‘Bill Mackenzie’
How to Grow Clematis florida 'Sieboldii'
HOW TO GROW PARTHENOCISSUS HENRYANA
HOW TO GROW THE VIRGINIA CREEPER
HOW TO GROW THE SNAIL VINE FROM SEED
HOW TO GROW THE SNAIL VINE FROM SEED
HOW TO GROW THE VIRGINIA CREEPER
HOW TO PROPAGATE CLEMATIS BY LAYERING
HOW TO TAKE CUTTINGS FROM CLEMATIS
HOW TO TREAT FOR CLEMATIS WILT?
THE BLUE CLEMATIS - Clematis x jackmanii
THE ORANGE PEEL CLEMATIS - Clematis tangutica
Trachelospermum jasminoides
WHY IS MY CLEMATIS NOT FLOWERING?

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