WALNUT TREES






The walnut is an edible seed of any tree of the genus Juglans, best known of which is the Persian walnut - Juglans regia, although in North America you could argue that it is in fact the native Black Walnut.

All types of walnuts are quite hardy, and actually require a cold winter period in order to thrive. So anyone living in warmer climates won’t have much success with their own walnut trees.

Walnuts will start to produce nuts at around 10 years of age, give full production at 30 years and keep on producing for more than 50 years. Depending on the specific variety of the walnut tree, they can grow up to 100 feet in height.

The walnut nut

Walnuts are rounded, single-seeded stone fruits of the walnut tree. It is enclosed in a green, leathery, fleshy husk, but this husk is inedible. After harvest, the removal of the husk reveals the wrinkly walnut shell, which is in two halves. This shell is hard and encloses the kernel, which is also made up of two halves separated by a partition.

Walnut seeds are high density source of nutrients, particularly proteins and essential fatty acids. Like other tree nuts, walnuts must be processed and stored properly. Worryingly, poor storage makes walnuts susceptible to insect and fungal mould infestations; the latter produces aflatoxin - a potent carcinogen. Mould infested walnut seed batch should not be screened then consumed - the entire batch should be discarded.

The seed kernels - commonly available as shelled walnuts - are enclosed in a brown seed coat which contains antioxidants. The antioxidants protect the oil-rich seed from atmospheric oxygen so preventing rancidity.

As mentioned previously there are two major varieties of walnuts grown for its seeds — the English walnut and the Black walnut. The Black walnut is of high flavour  but due to its hard shell and poor hulling characteristics it is not grown commercially for nut production. The commercially produced walnut varieties are nearly all hybrids of the English walnut.

How to grow walnut trees

Locate your planting at least 60 feet from any sensitive plants or garden areas. Black walnut trees will do very well in a moist bottom area that is well drained, or on a moist hillside or upland site. They will tolerate occasional dry spells, and they accept any soil pH from moderately acidic to moderately alkaline.

If you are planting walnuts as garden trees, space the plantings about 60-70 feet apart so their crowns can develop a majestic spread as they mature. However, if you're planting black walnuts for their valuable wood, plant them about 30 feet apart so their trunks will grow long and straight.

Planting the seeds If you choose to start your walnut tree from a seed, you will want to either plant your seeds where you want your final tree, or transplant it while very small. Walnuts do not do well at all in containers because of deep tap roots and don’t handle transplanting.

 You can plant with or without the husk still on, though taking the husk off will help the plant germinate. Plant your nuts in the fall, and protect them from squirrels. They need a period of cold before they will sprout. It only needs to be about 3 inches under the soil. They should sprout in 4 to 5 months, or possibly not until the following year.

Gather the nuts as they fall from a tree in your area, and remove the husks. Place half a dozen nuts several inches apart in a cluster, four or five inches deep. If you have squirrels, lay a piece of hardware cloth over the planting spot and pin it to the ground with v-shaped wires. Lay a mulch of straw or leaves over the hardware cloth to reduce the freeze/thaw cycles. Mark the site so you can find it again. After autumn planting and a session of damp, cold weather, the walnut seeds will germinate in the spring. Remove the mulch and hardware cloth from the planting spot in late winter, and mark the spot clearly so you don't accidentally mow over it!

After the baby trees have grown for a few months, choose the best one and eliminate the others. caring for your walnut tree.

Caring for your walnut tree

Depending on the age and size of the tree, you may not be able to significantly treat diseases or insect infestations on a walnut tree. Webworms or tent caterpillars can be a problem if there are too many of them on your trees. They build large tents of webbing, that can house hundreds of hungry caterpillars. Cut any branches off with tents and dispose of them carefully.

Full size trees have very long and deep root systems, which usually can protect them from moisture problems on the surface. But after very prolonged periods of drought, your trees might need some watering. You can end up with “burned” walnuts come harvest time if you let your trees get too dry for too long. Walnut trees should be left to grow naturally without pruning.

For related articles click onto:
Agapanthus
Amazing Tree Facts
Araucaria
Auriculas
Banana Plants
Bird of Paradise Flower
Bougainvillea
Buy Echium Seed
Bomarea caldasii
Dicksonia antarctica
Dinosaur Plants: The Tree Fern
Echium pininana
Euphorbia pulcherrima - The Poinsettia
Ficus elastica
Gasteria maculata
Growing Lavender
Hibiscus
How to Break Dormancy in Seeds
How to Care for Poinsettias
How to Grow Agapanthus
How to Grow the Baobab from Seed
How to Grow Foxgloves from Seed - By Terence Baker
How to Grow Hibiscus
How to Grow Lavender
How to Grow Lavender
How to Grow Lavender from Seed
How to Grow Banana Trees from Seed
How to Grow Pansies from Seed
How to Grow Roses from Cuttings
How to Grow the Sago Palm from Seed
How to Grow Tree Ferns
How to Propagate lavender from Cuttings?
How to Prune an Apple Tree
How to Prune Raspberries
How to Prune Roses
How to Take Cuttings from Box Hedging
How to Take Cuttings from Clematis
How to Take Chrysanthemum Cuttings
How to take Cuttings from Fuchsia
How to Take Cuttings from Grape Vines
How to Take Cuttings from Lavender
How to take Cuttings from Rosemary
How to take Cuttings from Roses
How to Take Honeysuckle Cuttings
How to Take Hydrangea Cuttings
How to Take Hardwood Cuttings
Japanese Flowering Cherries - Prunus species
Lavender
Monkey Tree
Plants
Rosemary
Schlumbergera Species - The Christmas Cacti
Strelitzia
THE AFRICAN TULIP TREE - Spathodea campanulata
The Black Rose
The Devil's Hand Tree -  Chiranthodendron pentadactylon
The Dragon Blood Tree 
The Eyeball Plant
The Giant Amazon Water Lily
The Giant Horsetail - Equisetum giganteum
The Hardy Begonia - Begonia grandis
The Marlborough Rock Daisy - Pachystegia insignis
The Monkey Puzzle Tree - Araucaria araucana
The Snowdrop
The Tree Fern
The Trumpet Vine
The Wollemi Pine
Walnut Trees
What is an Agave?
What is a Banana?
What is a Baobab tree?
What is an F1 Hybrid?
What is Lavender?
What is lavender Oil?
What is Lobelia?
What is Seed Dormancy?
Walnuts
What is a Walnut?
When and how should you prune back Lavender?
When to Prune Apple Trees
When to Prune Roses?
Why is my Tree Fern Dead?
Based on an article from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walnut and http://treenotes.blogspot.co.uk/2007/10/how-to-grow-black-walnut-tree-from-seed.html and http://www.gardeningblog.net/how-to-grow/walnuts/
Image care of http://www.redbubble.com/people/rosiea100/works/4013033-walnut-tree and http://plants4presents.co.uk/giftoptions.aspx?gif=337

ANCIENT OLYMPIC GAMES




The Ancient Olympic Games were a series of competitions held between representatives of several city-states and kingdoms in Ancient Greece. These games featured mainly athletic but also combat and chariot racing events.

The Olympics were of fundamental religious importance, featuring sporting events alongside ritual sacrifices honoring both Zeus - whose famous statue by Phidias stood in his temple at Olympia and Pelops, divine hero and mythical king of Olympia.

At the first one-day Olympic Games, the only event was a short sprint from one end of the stadium to the other.

Gradually more events were added to make four days of competitions. They included wrestling, boxing, long jump, throwing the javelin and discus, and chariot racing. In the pentathlon, there were five events: running, wrestling, javelin, discus and long jump. One of the toughest events was the race for hoplites, men wearing armour and carrying shields.

Only male citizens were eligible to compete in the Olympic Games. The term "citizen" refers to a man who participated in local politics, voted and provided military service. Citizens were of Greek descent and had jobs or trades, slaves were not allowed to compete.

Some of the most skilled competitors had humble job titles: The first Olympi­c champion was Koroibos, a cook who won the stadion race in 776 B.C.
Winners were given a wreath of leaves, and a hero's welcome back home.

Winners might marry rich women, enjoy free meals, invitations to parties, and the best seats in the theatre.

The running track was much wider than a modern one. Twenty people could run at once.

Olympic gamesmanship?

Probably the pankration or all-in wrestling was the nastiest event. There were hardly any rules. Biting and poking people's eyes were officially banned, but some competitors did both!

While it does not seem very sporting to us, all-in wrestling was very popular. Boxing was tough too. The fighters wore leather gloves and a boxer was allowed to go on hitting his opponent even after he'd knocked him to the ground!

However, cheating was punished. Anyone caught cheating, trying to bribe an athlete for instance, had to pay for a bronze statue of Zeus, as a punishment.

The Olympic Games reached their peak in the 6th and 5th centuries BC, but then gradually declined in importance as the Romans gained power and influence in Greece.

Olympic facts

1. No-one actually knows when the Olympic Games began. The earliest recorded event was at Olympia, Greece in 776 BC, but it was probably held even earlier.

2. From 776 BC onwards, it was held every four years, and the ancient Greeks calculated their calender in four year periods called 'Olympiads'.


3. The word "gymnasium" comes from the Greek root "gymnos" meaning nude. In fact, the literal meaning of "gymnasium" is "school for naked exercise." This makes more sense when you find out that athletes in the ancient Olympic Games would have participated in the nude!

4. The ancient Olympics ended in AD 393 when the Roman Emperor Theodosius banned the games because they were becoming too pagan.

5. The earliest games were held to honour Zeus and included a ceasefire in all wars in the region.

6. When the modern Olympics began in Athens in 1896, only 13 countries took part.

7. The five Olympic rings represent the five major regions of the world – Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe and Oceana, and every national flag in the world includes one of the five colors, which are (from left to right) blue, yellow, black, green, and red.


8. The last Olympic gold medals that were made entirely out of gold were awarded in 1912. Nowadays, each medal must be at least three millimeters thick and 60 millimeters in diameter. Also, the gold and silver Olympic medals must be made out of 92.5 percent silver, with the gold medal covered in six grams of gold.

9.  During the 1900 Olympic archery competition, live pigeons were used as targets.

10. Britain has always won at least one gold in every modern Olympics - however, one was the grand total of gold medals for the UK in 1904, 1952 and 1996 - embarrassing!

11. Because of World War I and World War II, there were no Olympic Games in 1916, 1940, or 1944.

12. During the ancient Olympic games, married woman were barred from watching the games. In fact the only only married woman allowed in was the Priestess of Demeter - a goddess of the harvest.


13. Women were first allowed to participate in 1900 at the second modern Olympic Games.

14. Three continents – Africa, South America, and Antarctica – have never hosted an Olympics.

15. The 'Berlin Olympics' held in 1936 were the first Olympic games ever to be broadcast on television.
16. Olympian Oscar Swahn of Sweden is the oldest olympian to have participated in any of the olympic events so far. He was a shooter who participated at the 1920 Antwerp Games at the age of 72 years.

17. Baron Pierre De Coubertin of France is known as the father of the modern olympics.

18. The very first modern olympics were held in Athens, Greece 1896.



19. The famous wrestler Milo was said to train by carrying a calf every day. As the calf grew heavier, his muscles got stronger.



For related articles click onto:
American Revolution: The truth behind the Boston Tea Party

Ancient Olympic Games

ATHENS: How to get to Athens City from Athens International Airport
ATHENS: The Arch of Hadrian
ATHENS: The Arch of Hadrian
ATHENS: The Caryatids
ATHENS: The Parthenon
ATHENS: The Temple of Zeus
ATHENS: The Tower of the Winds
Bass Reeves 
Charles Darwin's Greatest Experiment
Charles Darwins Legacy - 200 years on

Cleopatra's Needle
Christopher Columbus
Cowboys and Lawmen: Who was Bass Reeves?
Darwin's Theory of Evolution

Eden Project Hotels
EGYPT: Where is the river Nile?
EGYPT: Where is the source of the Nile?
ENGLAND: Hever Castle
ENGLAND: Knole House - the Ghosts!
ENGLAND: Sissinghurst
ENGLAND: What is Stonehenge?
ENGLAND: Where is Stonehenge?
FRANCE: The Palais des Papes
FRANCE: The Versailles Gardens
GREECE: The Ancient Olympics
GREEK HISTORY: Who was Archimedes?
How to get to Herculaneum from Sorrento
How to get to Naples Archaeological Museum from Sorrento
How to get to Pompeii from Sorrento
How to get to Sorrento from Naples International Airport
How to get to Sorrento from Naples International Airport?
How to get to Valencia beach from Valencia city
ITALIAN HISTORY: Who was Julius Caesar?
ITALY: Rome Pictures
ITALY: What is Pompeii?
ITALY: Where is Pompei?
Knole House and the Ghost with no Name 

LONDON: Big Ben
LONDON: Buckingham Palace
LONDON: Cleopatra's Needle
LONDON: Who was Guy Fawkes? Olympic Facts
PARIS: The Arc de Triomphe
PARIS: The Eiffel Tower
PARIS: The Louvre
PARIS: Where is the Eiffel Tower?
PARIS: Where is the Louvre?
Rembrandts House
Rembrandt Museum
ROMAN BRITAIN: Who was Gnaeus Julius Agricola?
Rome: How to get to Villa D'Este from Rome
Rome: How to make Roman bread - Panis
RHS Wisley Gardens - A Photographic Walk Through
RMS TITANIC - Father Frank Brownes Photographs
Rome: Gladiator Graveyard Discovered!
Rome: How to get to Villa Adriana from Rome
Rome: How to get to Villa D'Este from Rome
Rome: Julius Caesar
Rome: Opening Times for Villa D'Este
Rome: Photographs of and around the Colosseum at Night

ROME: The Colosseum
Rome: Villa Adriana - Tivoli

ROME: Villa d'Este
Rome: What did Gladiators Eat?
Rome: What did the Romans Eat?

ROME: What was a Gladiator?
Rome: Who were the Ancient Gladiators? 

ROMAN HISTORY: What did the Romans Eat?
Sissinghurst Gardens - a secret history

The Alamo 
The Boston Tea Party
The Eden Project
The Eiffel Tower
The Evolution and Devolution of Man - Finally explained

The First Thanksgiving
The Fountain of Youth
The Flying Dutchman

The History of the Olympic Games

The History of Thanksgiving
The Mary Celeste
The Olympic Games The Olympic Medal 

The Roman Colosseum
The Sinking of the Titanic
The Titanic

The Truth about the Alamo 
Titanic Pictures
Titanic Survivors

VALENCIA: La Lonja de la Seda
VALENCIA: The Turia River
Valencia - How to get to Valencia City from Valencia Airport
Villa d'Este
Was Abraham Lincoln a Vampire?
What is the Eden Project?
What is the Flying Dutchman? 
What is the Louvre?
What is Thanksgiving?
What is the Fountain of Youth?
When is Thanksgiving?
Where is the Garden of Eden?
Where is the Louvre?
Where is Sissinghurst? 

Where was Abraham Lincoln from?
Where is the Eden Project?
Where to find the Fountain of Youth?
Where is the Nile?
Where is Pompei?
Where is Sorrento?
Where is Sorrento?
Where is the Source of the Nile?
Who was Abraham Lincoln?
Who was Christopher Columbus?
Wyatt Earp
Cowboys and Lawmen: Who was Wyatt Earp?
Based on an article by William Hartston published in the Daily Express 26/7/2012 and http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/primaryhistory/ancient_greeks/the_olympic_games/ and http://entertainment.howstuffworks.com/first-olympics3.htm
Images care of http://cd7.e2bn.net/e2bn/leas/c99/schools/cd7/veryoldwebsite/Greece.htm and http://www.jeanpaulleblanc.com/Miscellaneous.htm and http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/sportingscene/2012/07/londons-first-olympics.html and 
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/46905163/ns/technology_and_science-science/t/fighting-champ-was-recruiter-ancient-roman-army/

THE GLORIANA




The Royal barge Gloriana began life as a project initiated by Lord Sterling. He received the inspiration for a waterborne tribute to the Queen for her Diamond Jubilee from her eldest son, Charles, Prince of Wales. Not only did he come up with he idea, Lord Sterling put his hand in his pocket and part-financed the estimated £500,000 construction cost of the project. Additional backers included Sir Donald Gosling and Canadian billionaire Galen Weston.

On 19 April 2012, Gloriana was transported by road from the Richmond Bridge Boathouses factory to the River Thames, being placed in the water for the first time at Isleworth.

The Queen officially named her on 25 April 2012, during a visit to re-open the restored Cutty Sark in Greenwich.

Mr. Mark Edwards, owner of Richmond Bridge Boathouses had this to say regarding his role in the construction of the Royal barge Gloriana:

"The reason I was contacted for this, because 10 years ago we built the Jubilant."

"With that in mind and the requirement for a larger vessel, Lord Sterling came up with the idea to build a proper state barge and I was there to advise on the rowing aspect of it and that was two years ago."

“There was a proposal for one to be built but the original plan fell by the wayside so I suggested I could build a very traditional wooden one and they went for that. I was chosen as the boat builder and so I called in my eight boat builders and then eight boat builders from all over England.”

"The boat’s keel, made from iroko, a west African timber, was laid in November last year and just 20 weeks later, after months of everyone working double shifts, the boat launched in Isleworth on April 25." 

 “We have had a common aim and everyone has worked fantastically to achieve the vessel. It’s an amazing vessel that turns every eye, so when we have been out on the water people don’t carry on walking, they actually stop. It is a most glorious sight with the carvings and the gold leaf.”

The Diamond Jubilee river pageant

The Gloriana was the lead vessel in the Thames Diamond Jubilee Pageant, a parade of over 1,000 boats and ships down the River Thames in London, organised as part of the Diamond Jubilee celebrations. She led members of the Royal Family other than the Queen and her husband Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, who were aboard another Royal barge - the 64-metre-long (210 ft) MV Spirit of Chartwell.

Among the 18 rowers powering the Gloriana were Olympic gold medallists Sir Steve Redgrave and Sir Matthew Pinsent and British servicemen – Will Dixon, Rory Mackenzie and Neil Heritage – who all lost limbs in Iraq and Afghanistan.

During the pageant Gloriana carried ten flags, among them those representing the four home nations: England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, as well as the flag of the City of London and the flag of Cornwall.

Despite the fact that elements of Gloriana’s design can be traced back more than 1,600 years and the technology used in its construction is very much rooted in the past, the barge is fitted with auxillary propellors powered by high-tech lithium-ion batteries - just in case.

After leading the Jubilee parade, the Royal barge Gloriana was presented to the Queen as a gift.


For related articles click onto:
American Revolution: The truth behind the Boston Tea Party
Ancient Olympic Games
BATH: Roman Baths
Buckingham Palace
Charles Darwin's Greatest Experiment
Charles Darwins Legacy - 200 years on
Christopher Columbus
Cowboys and Lawmen: Who was Bass Reeves?
Cowboys and Lawmen: Who was Wyatt Earp?
Darwin 
Darwin's Theory of Evolution
Hever Castle
Hot Spa
How Big is Big Ben?
Knole House and the Ghost with no Name
LONDON: Big Ben
LONDON: Buckingham Palace
LONDON: The Eye of London
LONDON: The Houses of Parliament
LONDON: The London Eye
LONDON: The Tower of London 
LONDON: Tower Bridge
Olympic Facts
Rembrandts House
ROMAN ENGLAND: Who was Gnaeus Julius Agricola?
Roman England: The Kings Bath 
Rome: How to get to Villa D'Este from Rome
Rome: How to make Roman bread - Panis
RHS Wisley Gardens - A Photographic Walk Through
RMS TITANIC - Father Frank Brownes Photographs
Rome: Gladiator Graveyard Discovered!
Rome: How to get to Villa Adriana from Rome
Rome: How to get to Villa D'Este from Rome
Rome: Julius Caesar
Rome: Opening Times for Villa D'Este
Rome: Photographs of and around the Colosseum at Night
Rome: The Pantheon
Rome: Villa Adriana - Tivoli
Rome: What did Gladiators Eat?
Rome: What did the Romans Eat?
Rome: Who were the Ancient Gladiators?
Sissinghurst
Sissinghurst Gardens - a secret history
The Evolution and Devolution of Man - Finally explained
The Flying Dutchman
The Garden of Eden
The Gunpowder Plot
The History of the Olympic Games
The Houses of Parliament
The London Clock
The Mary Celeste
The Olympic Medal
The Sinking of the Titanic
The Titanic
The Tower of London
Titanic Pictures
Titanic Survivors
Titanic: The last radio transmissions
What is the Flying Dutchman?
What is Stonehenge?
Where is Stonehenge?
Who was Charles Darwin
Who was Guy Fawkes?
Who was Julius Caesar?
Wyatt Earp
Based on an article from http://www.getsurrey.co.uk/news/s/2114802_jubilee_boat_builder_revels_in_gloriana_glory and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gloriana_(barge)
Images care of http://millerharris.blogspot.co.uk/2012_06_01_archive.html and http://www.classicboat.co.uk/uncategorized/meet-the-man-who-built-the-royal-rowbarge-gloriana/

THE OLYMPIC GAMES




The Ancient Olympic Games were a series of competitions held between representatives of several city-states and kingdoms in Ancient Greece. These games featured mainly athletic but also combat and chariot racing events.

The Olympics were of fundamental religious importance, featuring sporting events alongside ritual sacrifices honoring both Zeus - whose famous statue by Phidias stood in his temple at Olympia and Pelops, divine hero and mythical king of Olympia.

At the first one-day Olympic Games, the only event was a short sprint from one end of the stadium to the other.

Gradually more events were added to make four days of competitions. They included wrestling, boxing, long jump, throwing the javelin and discus, and chariot racing. In the pentathlon, there were five events: running, wrestling, javelin, discus and long jump. One of the toughest events was the race for hoplites, men wearing armour and carrying shields.

Only male citizens were eligible to compete in the Olympic Games. The term "citizen" refers to a man who participated in local politics, voted and provided military service. Citizens were of Greek descent and had jobs or trades, slaves were not allowed to compete.

Some of the most skilled competitors had humble job titles: The first Olympi­c champion was Koroibos, a cook who won the stadion race in 776 B.C.
Winners were given a wreath of leaves, and a hero's welcome back home.

Winners might marry rich women, enjoy free meals, invitations to parties, and the best seats in the theatre.

The running track was much wider than a modern one. Twenty people could run at once.

Olympic gamesmanship?

Probably the pankration or all-in wrestling was the nastiest event. There were hardly any rules. Biting and poking people's eyes were officially banned, but some competitors did both!

While it does not seem very sporting to us, all-in wrestling was very popular. Boxing was tough too. The fighters wore leather gloves and a boxer was allowed to go on hitting his opponent even after he'd knocked him to the ground!

However, cheating was punished. Anyone caught cheating, trying to bribe an athlete for instance, had to pay for a bronze statue of Zeus, as a punishment.

The Olympic Games reached their peak in the 6th and 5th centuries BC, but then gradually declined in importance as the Romans gained power and influence in Greece.

The modern Olympic movement

The first significant attempt to emulate the ancient Olympic Games was the L'Olympiade de la République, a national Olympic festival held annually from 1796 to 1798 in Revolutionary France. The competition included several disciplines from the ancient Greek Olympics.

In 1850 an Olympian Class was started by Dr William Penny Brookes at Much Wenlock, in Shropshire, England.

 In 1859, Dr Brookes changed the name to Wenlock Olympian Games. This annual sports festival continues to this day.

In 1890, after attending the Olympian Games of the Wenlock Olympian Society, Baron Pierre de Coubertin was inspired to found the International Olympic Committee (IOC).

Coubertin managed to establish and internationally rotating Olympic Games that would occur every four years giving birth to the modern Olympic movement that we still see today.

Olympic facts

1. No-one actually knows when the Olympic Games began. The earliest recorded event was at Olympia, Greece in 776 BC, but it was probably held even earlier.

2. From 776 BC onwards, it was held every four years, and the ancient Greeks calculated their calender in four year periods called 'Olympiads'.

3. The word "gymnasium" comes from the Greek root "gymnos" meaning nude. In fact, the literal meaning of "gymnasium" is "school for naked exercise." This makes more sense when you find out that athletes in the ancient Olympic Games would have participated in the nude!

4. The ancient Olympics ended in AD 393 when the Roman Emperor Theodosius banned the games because they were becoming too pagan.

5. The earliest games were held to honour Zeus and included a ceasefire in all wars in the region.

6. When the modern Olympics began in Athens in 1896, only 13 countries took part.

7. The five Olympic rings represent the five major regions of the world – Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe and Oceana, and every national flag in the world includes one of the five colors, which are (from left to right) blue, yellow, black, green, and red.

8. The last Olympic gold medals that were made entirely out of gold were awarded in 1912. Nowadays, each medal must be at least three millimeters thick and 60 millimeters in diameter. Also, the gold and silver Olympic medals must be made out of 92.5 percent silver, with the gold medal covered in six grams of gold.

9.  During the 1900 Olympic archery competition, live pigeons were used as targets.

10. Britain has always won at least one gold in every modern Olympics - however, one was the grand total of gold medals for the UK in 1904, 1952 and 1996 - embarrassing!

11. Because of World War I and World War II, there were no Olympic Games in 1916, 1940, or 1944.

12. During the ancient Olympic games, married woman were barred from watching the games. In fact the only only married woman allowed in was the Priestess of Demeter - a goddess of the harvest.


13. Women were first allowed to participate in 1900 at the second modern Olympic Games.

14. Three continents – Africa, South America, and Antarctica – have never hosted an Olympics.

15. The 'Berlin Olympics' held in 1936 were the first Olympic games ever to be broadcast on television.
16. Olympian Oscar Swahn of Sweden is the oldest olympian to have participated in any of the olympic events so far. He was a shooter who participated at the 1920 Antwerp Games at the age of 72 years.

17. Baron Pierre De Coubertin of France is known as the father of the modern olympics.

18. The very first modern olympics were held in Athens, Greece 1896.



19. The famous wrestler Milo was said to train by carrying a calf every day. As the calf grew heavier, his muscles got stronger.



For related articles click onto:
American Revolution: The truth behind the Boston Tea Party

Ancient Olympic Games 
Charles Darwin's Greatest Experiment
Charles Darwins Legacy - 200 years on
Christopher Columbus
Cowboys and Lawmen: Who was Bass Reeves?
Darwin's Theory of Evolution

GREECE: The Ancient Olympics
Knole House and the Ghost with no Name 

Olympic Facts
Rembrandts House
Rome: How to get to Villa D'Este from Rome
Rome: How to make Roman bread - Panis
RHS Wisley Gardens - A Photographic Walk Through
RMS TITANIC - Father Frank Brownes Photographs
Rome: Gladiator Graveyard Discovered!
Rome: How to get to Villa Adriana from Rome
Rome: How to get to Villa D'Este from Rome
Rome: Julius Caesar
Rome: Opening Times for Villa D'Este
Rome: Photographs of and around the Colosseum at Night
Rome: Villa Adriana - Tivoli
Rome: What did Gladiators Eat?
Rome: What did the Romans Eat?
Rome: Who were the Ancient Gladiators?
Sissinghurst Gardens - a secret history
The Evolution and Devolution of Man - Finally explained
The Flying Dutchman

The History of the Olympic Games
The Olympic Games The Olympic Medal 
The Sinking of the Titanic
The Titanic
Titanic Pictures
Titanic Survivors
Where is Sissinghurst?
Wyatt Earp
Cowboys and Lawmen: Who was Wyatt Earp?
Based on an article by William Hartston published in the Daily Express 26/7/2012 and http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/primaryhistory/ancient_greeks/the_olympic_games/ and http://entertainment.howstuffworks.com/first-olympics3.htm
Images care of http://cd7.e2bn.net/e2bn/leas/c99/schools/cd7/veryoldwebsite/Greece.htm and http://www.jeanpaulleblanc.com/Miscellaneous.htm and http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/sportingscene/2012/07/londons-first-olympics.html and 
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/46905163/ns/technology_and_science-science/t/fighting-champ-was-recruiter-ancient-roman-army/

THE HISTORY OF THE OLYMPIC GAMES




The Ancient Olympic Games were a series of competitions held between representatives of several city-states and kingdoms in Ancient Greece. These games featured mainly athletic but also combat and chariot racing events.

The Olympics were of fundamental religious importance, featuring sporting events alongside ritual sacrifices honoring both Zeus - whose famous statue by Phidias stood in his temple at Olympia and Pelops, divine hero and mythical king of Olympia.

At the first one-day Olympic Games, the only event was a short sprint from one end of the stadium to the other.

Gradually more events were added to make four days of competitions. They included wrestling, boxing, long jump, throwing the javelin and discus, and chariot racing. In the pentathlon, there were five events: running, wrestling, javelin, discus and long jump. One of the toughest events was the race for hoplites, men wearing armour and carrying shields.

Only male citizens were eligible to compete in the Olympic Games. The term "citizen" refers to a man who participated in local politics, voted and provided military service. Citizens were of Greek descent and had jobs or trades, slaves were not allowed to compete.

Some of the most skilled competitors had humble job titles: The first Olympi­c champion was Koroibos, a cook who won the stadion race in 776 B.C.

Winners were given a wreath of leaves, and a hero's welcome back home. Winners might marry rich women, enjoy free meals, invitations to parties, and the best seats in the theatre.

The running track was much wider than a modern one. Twenty people could run at once.

The Olympic Games reached their peak in the 6th and 5th centuries BC, but then gradually declined in importance as the Romans gained power and influence in Greece.

The first significant attempt to emulate the ancient Olympic Games was the L'Olympiade de la République, a national Olympic festival held annually from 1796 to 1798 in Revolutionary France. The competition included several disciplines from the ancient Greek Olympics.

In 1850 an Olympian Class was started by Dr William Penny Brookes at Much Wenlock, in Shropshire, England.

 In 1859, Dr Brookes changed the name to Wenlock Olympian Games. This annual sports festival continues to this day.

In 1890, after attending the Olympian Games of the Wenlock Olympian Society, Baron Pierre de Coubertin was inspired to found the International Olympic Committee (IOC).

Coubertin managed to establish and internationally rotating Olympic Games that would occur every four years giving birth to the modern Olympic movement that we still see today.

Olympic facts

1. No-one actually knows when the Olympic Games began. The earliest recorded event was at Olympia, Greece in 776 BC, but it was probably held even earlier.

2. From 776 BC onwards, it was held every four years, and the ancient Greeks calculated their calender in four year periods called 'Olympiads'.

3. The word "gymnasium" comes from the Greek root "gymnos" meaning nude. In fact, the literal meaning of "gymnasium" is "school for naked exercise." This makes more sense when you find out that athletes in the ancient Olympic Games would have participated in the nude!

4. The ancient Olympics ended in AD 393 when the Roman Emperor Theodosius banned the games because they were becoming too pagan.

5. The earliest games were held to honour Zeus and included a ceasefire in all wars in the region.

6. When the modern Olympics began in Athens in 1896, only 13 countries took part.

7. The five Olympic rings represent the five major regions of the world – Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe and Oceana, and every national flag in the world includes one of the five colors, which are (from left to right) blue, yellow, black, green, and red.

8. The last Olympic gold medals that were made entirely out of gold were awarded in 1912. Nowadays, each medal must be at least three millimeters thick and 60 millimeters in diameter. Also, the gold and silver Olympic medals must be made out of 92.5 percent silver, with the gold medal covered in six grams of gold.

9.  During the 1900 Olympic archery competition, live pigeons were used as targets.

10. Britain has always won at least one gold in every modern Olympics - however, one was the grand total of gold medals for the UK in 1904, 1952 and 1996 - embarrassing!

11. Because of World War I and World War II, there were no Olympic Games in 1916, 1940, or 1944.

12. During the ancient Olympic games, married woman were barred from watching the games. In fact the only only married woman allowed in was the Priestess of Demeter - a goddess of the harvest.


13. Women were first allowed to participate in 1900 at the second modern Olympic Games.

14. Three continents – Africa, South America, and Antarctica – have never hosted an Olympics.

15. The 'Berlin Olympics' held in 1936 were the first Olympic games ever to be broadcast on television.





16. Olympian Oscar Swahn of Sweden is the oldest olympian to have participated in any of the olympic events so far. He was a shooter who participated at the 1920 Antwerp Games at the age of 72 years.

17. Baron Pierre De Coubertin of France is known as the father of the modern olympics.

18. The very first modern olympics were held in Athens, Greece 1896. 




For related articles click onto:
American Revolution: The truth behind the Boston Tea Party

Ancient Olympic Games 
Charles Darwin's Greatest Experiment
Charles Darwins Legacy - 200 years on
Christopher Columbus
Cowboys and Lawmen: Who was Bass Reeves?
Darwin's Theory of Evolution
Knole House and the Ghost with no Name 

Olympic Facts
Rembrandts House
Rome: How to get to Villa D'Este from Rome
Rome: How to make Roman bread - Panis
RHS Wisley Gardens - A Photographic Walk Through
RMS TITANIC - Father Frank Brownes Photographs
Rome: Gladiator Graveyard Discovered!
Rome: How to get to Villa Adriana from Rome
Rome: How to get to Villa D'Este from Rome
Rome: Julius Caesar
Rome: Opening Times for Villa D'Este
Rome: Photographs of and around the Colosseum at Night
Rome: Villa Adriana - Tivoli
Rome: What did Gladiators Eat?
Rome: What did the Romans Eat?
Rome: Who were the Ancient Gladiators?
Sissinghurst Gardens - a secret history
The Evolution and Devolution of Man - Finally explained
The Flying Dutchman

The History of the Olympic Games

The History of Thanksgiving
The Olympic Games 
The Olympic Medal 
The Sinking of the Titanic
The Titanic
Titanic Pictures
Titanic Survivors
Where is Sissinghurst?
Wyatt Earp
Cowboys and Lawmen: Who was Wyatt Earp?
Based on an article by William Hartston published in the Daily Express 26/7/2012 and http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/primaryhistory/ancient_greeks/the_olympic_games/ and http://entertainment.howstuffworks.com/first-olympics3.htm
Images care of http://cd7.e2bn.net/e2bn/leas/c99/schools/cd7/veryoldwebsite/Greece.htm and http://www.jeanpaulleblanc.com/Miscellaneous.htm and http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/sportingscene/2012/07/londons-first-olympics.html