HOW TO GROW KIWIFRUIT FROM SEED




To begin with, remove the seeds from your chosen piece of kiwi fruit and lay them on a paper towel to dry. Make sure the seeds they are placed in an area where they will remain undisturbed for two days.

Fill a sealable plastic bag with vermiculite or perlite substrate. Add the dried kiwi seeds to the substrate, seal the bag and place it in the bottom of a refrigerator for a minimum of four months.

Once this cold period is over they are ready for potting. First, fill a 6-inch pot with sterilized potting compost such as John Innes 'Seed and Potting'. Then remove the kiwi seeds from the refrigerator and plant them in the potting soil at a depth of 1/8 of an inch and 1 inch apart.

Moisten the compost with a spray bottle of water and cover the pot with a piece of glass, clear plastic or cling film, secured with a rubber band. Place the pot in a warm area while the kiwi seeds germinate.

Remove the plastic wrap once the kiwi seeds begin to germinate, and continue spraying the kiwi seeds with water to keep the soil moist.

Place the pot in an area that receives direct sunlight for at least six hours per day.

Transplant the kiwi seedlings outdoors during the spring, in well-drained soil that preferably has an acidic pH between 5.5 to 7.0.

If you are not sure of your soil's pH you can test the soil with a shop bough pH soil tester in order to determine the acidity before planting. If necessary, amend the soil with lime raise the pH and moss-peat to lower it.

Once in the ground, you will need to water the kiwi plants each week as necessary for the first year.

Also, fertilize the young kiwi vine with a 10-10-10 fertilizer according to the label instructions. As the kiwi vine matures it will need supporting with wires or trellis.

You will also find that applying a layer of mulch around the kiwi plants will reduce weed growth and improve drainage.

Do not overwater the kiwi plants or you can cause root damage.

For related articles click onto the following links:
ACTINIDIA KOLOMIKTA
BUY KIWI FRUIT SEED
HOW TO GROW ACTINIDIA CHINENSIS
HOW TO GROW ACTINIDIA KOLOMIKTA
HOW TO GROW ACTINIDIA KOLOMIKTA FROM SEED
HOW TO GROW A CHERRY TREE FROM SEED
HOW TO GROW FIG 'BROWN TURKEY'
HOW TO GROW KIWI FROM SEED
HOW TO GROW LAPAGERIA ROSEA FROM SEED
HOW TO GROW A MULBERRY TREE
What is a Fig?

4 comments:

EDT514 Ambro said...

Many are discussing sprouting Kiwi from seed then mention that one needs a male and a female plant. Other than growing many plants that take up a lot of space and waiting 3 - 4 years to bloom, is there any way to determine the gender to know which ones to keep in the first place?

Why is this never discussed by any of these authors touting growing from seed?
I tried peeking under the leaves but no dice….

Simon Eade said...

Hi Ambro, and thank you for your question. Of course, you cannot tell which are male or female until they mature. So when it comes to planting out new stock for fruit production you would purchase vegetatively propagated specimens from which the sex of the parent plant was already known. Kind regards, Simon

EDT514 Ambro said...

So, what you seem to be suggesting is that after going through all the motions of germinating Kiwi from seed and you have growing healthy plants that one then tosses all of them aside to purchase plants of which you would then know the gender.

Either it is that or one should care for a multitude of plants for four years so that when they finally flower one will then know which ones to keep typically being one male for up to six females.

It kinda renders moot the whole discussion of growing kiwi from seed, doesn't it?
OTOH, maybe there is some industry that promotes growing Kiwi for some purpose other than fruit production but that is not discussed in any of these articles either.

Simon Eade said...

No, I am suggesting that if you are planning to grow lines of kiwi plants for commercial production then buy the specific ratio of male and female cultivars you need which would have, of course, been propagated vegetatively. If you want to grow them for fun from seed, or have a mind to discover a new and improved cultivar then this article explains how. Unless you do not have access to modern kiwifruit cultivars, why would you go to all the time and trouble to grow plants destined for fruit production from seed? This is actually a waste of time especially as seeds taken from selected cultivars do not grow true to the parents.

So I don't understand your argument. I along with many thousands of others enjoy growing citrus plants from seed. Like kiwifruit, I know they will not grow true to the parent plant and I know that it will take 10-15 years before citrus plants flower and fruit, but I get enjoyment from it. However when I want fruiting plants I go out and buy the cultivars I want. Gardening is about making people happy, and I like to challenge myself by growing plants from seed. If these answers are not what you want to hear then I suggest you do your research first before commencing on such a project in future.