HOW TO GROW ARTICHOKES FROM SEED




Artichokes are at risk of becoming one of the gardeners worst kept secrets. Still considered to be a true gourmet food, artichokes once commanded such high prices that only kings and members of the aristocracy could afford to eat them. Today things are a little different with hundreds of varieties available - even to the passionate, amateur gardener - with many of them suitable for growing as an annual or perennial crop - even in the cooler northern European climates. If you are prepared to do a little research you can still buy a few of the old historic varieties such as 'Violetta di Chioggia', and 'Gros Vert de Laon'.

.The unavoidable fact and so called ‘worst kept secret’ is that artichokes plants are just so easy to grow from seed. While they will not all grow genetically ‘true’ to the parent plants, because they are so easy to germinate it is just a matter of growing a few extra plants so that any rogue specimens that turn up can be removed later on without the worry of losing some of your future crop.
.
Artichokes can be started from seed in a greenhouse, conservatory or even in a well lit, warm room by the windowsill. Starting anytime from around late February, plant a couple of seeds into 9cm pots using a good quality soil-based composts such as John Innes ‘Seed’. You may wish to mix in a little horticultural grit or perlite to help with the drainage. Give the seeds a further, light covering of compost, then water in well - placing them in a greenhouse or warm room once the excess water has drained off. Water as necessary from that point on, but at no time should the compost be left sodden or be allowed to completely dry out.

The seeds should germinate between 2-3 weeks but they will need to remain in their protected environment right up until the threat of late frosts are over. Wait a couple of weeks after germination before removing the weaker artichoke seedlings from each pot. They can now be placed outside, but they will still need 2-3 weeks to harden off before planting out into their final position, so try to keep them under some sort of cover such as a cold frame or plastic tunnel. Starting them off early in a protected environment like this is a vital step in producing artichokes during the first year, whether they are grown as an annual or as a perennial.
.
Artichoke seedlings need lots of nutrients as they develop, so feed them once a week with a good quality liquid plant fertiliser. They will be ready for planting outside once the soil has warmed up and - as said before - once the danger of frost is over. Typically the transplants should be around 8 to 10 inches tall, with stocky stems and two sets of true leaves. Because they grow quite large, they should be planted at least 4 feet apart into a rich, deep, free-draining soil. For best results place them in a sheltered position where they can receive full sun for most of the day.
.
For more information click onto:
Agave Seeds
Aloe vera
Aloe vera seeds
Artichokes
Asparagus
Bamboo
Buy Artichoke Seeds
Gardenofeaden
Growing Artichokes from Seed
Growing Cabbage from Seed
Growing Carrots
Growing Celery from Seed
Growing Mushrooms
Growing Parsnips from Seed
History of the Globe Artichoke
How do you Harden off Seedlings?
How to Compost
How to Germinate and Grow Cucumbers from Seed
How to Germinate and Grow Melon Plants from Seed
How to Germinate and Grow Okra from Seed Indoors
How to Grow Agave from Seed
How to Grow Aloe vera from Seed
How to Grow Amaranth
How to Grow Aubergines From Seed
How to Grow Avocado from Seed
How to Grow Bamboo
How to Grow Beetroot from Seed
How to Grow the Angel's Trumpet from Seed
How to Grow Asparagus
How to grow Brassicas from Seed
How to Grow Broad Beans
How to Grow Broccoli
How to Grow Brussels Sprouts from Seed
How to Grow Brassicas from Seed
How to Grow Cabbage from Seed
How to Grow Carrots from Seed
How to Grow Chinese Spinach from Seed
How to Grow Cilantro
How to grow Cilantro from Seed
How to Grow Courgettes
How Grow Courgettes from Seed
How to Grow Celery from Seed
How to grow Cucumbers
How to Grow Cucumbers from Seed
How to Grow Outdoor Cucumbers
How to grow Cauliflower from Seed
How to Grow Cauliflowers from Seed
How to Grow Cucumbers from Seed
How to Grow Eggplants from Seed
How to Grow French Beans from Seed?
How to Grow From Seed
How to Grow Giant Onions
How to Grow Leeks from Seed
How to Grow Marrows from Seed
How to Grow Mushrooms
How to Grow Mushrooms at Home
How to Grow Okra
How to Grow Okra from Seed Outdoors
How to Grow Oyster Mushrooms
How to grow Peas from Seed
How to Grow Peppers from Seed
How to Grow Red Kidney Beans from Dried Seed
How to Grow Rocket from Seed
How to Grow Rosemary from Cuttings?
How to Grow Runner Beans from Seed
How to Plant and Grow Artichokes
How to Grow Parsnips
How to Grow Plants
How to Grow Peanuts
How to Grow Peppadew Peppers from Seed
How to Grow Peppers
How to Grow Potatoes
How to Grow Potatoes
How to Grow Pumpkins from Seed
How to Grow Runner Beans from Seed
How to Grow Radishes
How to Grow Spinach from Seed
How to Grow Spinach from Seed
How to Grow Sweet Corn from Seed
How to Grow Sweet Potatoes
How to Grow Sweet Potatoes in Pots or Containers
How to Grow Tomatoes?
How to Grow Tomatoes
How to Grow Tomatoes
How to Grow Tomatoes
How to Grow Tomatoes from Seed
How to Grow Vegetables?
How to Grow Watercress
How to Propagate and Grow Chili Peppers from Seed
How to Plant and Grow Artichokes
How to Propagate Bamboo?
Mexican Jumping Bean
My Recipe for Globe Artichoke with Dijon Mustard
How to Sow and Grow Courgettes from Seed Indoors
How to Sow and Grow Courgettes from Seed Outdoors
How to Sow and Grow Spring Onions from Seed
Is a Peanut a Nut?
Plants
Planting Radishes from Seed
Potagers
The Blue Agave
The Peanut
The Mushroom
The Secrets to Growing Bonsai
The Snake's Head Fritillary - Fritallaria meleagris
What is Crop Rotation?
What is an Artichoke?
What is a Seed?
What is Composting?
What is the Difference between a Turnip and a Swede?
What is the Difference Between Fruit and Vegetables
What is a Peanut?
What is Quinoa?
What is a Vegetable?
Where do Peanuts come from?
Which part of an Artichoke can you eat?
Why haven't my Seeds Germinated?

4 comments:

Artichoke Extract said...

Hey thanks for the information. I wanted to grow artichoke. Now i can do it. I find artichoke very tasty. It is good for health. It is rich in iodine. It reduces cholesterol and improves blood circulation etc.

steve said...

growing artichokes is something new for me... well, my entire garden is new for me. i picked up two artichoke plants at a local nursery and added them to the garden. i later moved one of them to another location as it was too much in the shade and too close to the other one. that put a hurt on it and stunted its growth, but it's starting to look a lot better now.

i've picked up seed for green globe artichokes (same as the plants i picked up at the nursery) and put them in peet pots (8 total). i water as needed. planted them around june 15th and seedlings started poking through yesterday (23rd). it's exciting to think i may have a bunch more artichoke plants around!

Rebecca said...

Great post! A friend gifted me some heirloom artichoke seeds, so I'm looking forward to setting up an artichoke area. I was reading at another site that the hot summers of Florida might be hard on artichokes. Is that true? If so, I might need to re-think: we're hotter and more humid than Florida. Any suggestions? I was considering planting in partial shade.

Laura Silverman, MSW said...

I live in Atlanta, GA which is hot and humid and my neighbor has a huge plant growing unattended. Surely with a little loving care, I should be able to get these babies off and running!