HOW TO MAKE A NATURAL AND ORGANIC INSECTICIDE SPRAY FOR APHIDS




This is an easy and natural recipe for making an effective and organic aphid killer. It involves the use of plants from the Saponaria family, notably Saponaria ocymoides and Saponaria officinalis Both of these plants should be easily available from your local retail plant stockists. Saponaria ocymoides is usually classed as an invasive rock plant so not only will it produce plenty of material for you, it will also recover quickly supplying more material for future use.
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To create your natural aphid insecticide you simply add approximately 200 grams of leaves and/or roots to 250 millilitres of water, then add it to a blender making sure that the lid is on tightly. Once pulverised into a fine soapy solution, pour the resulting mixture through a culinary sieve, collecting the fluid into a suitable container. Now pour this 'clean' solution into a hand held spray bottle as the mix is ready to use. Your next step is to spray your aphids.

The secret as to why this recipe works is due to the high levels of naturally occurring phosphates that are found in plants from the Saponaria family. It's also these phosphates that create the soapiness of Saponaria and on a chemical level they are able to break down the water molecular attraction that causes surface tension. Aphids have a naturally hydrophilic (water repelling) skin which they use to help protect themselves from the rain, but this soapy solution allows the water to 'smother the aphids body. Like all insects, aphids breathe through specialised pores called ' Spiracles' that are found along its thorax and abdomen. If the insect becomes smothered by 'soapy' water it will quickly perish by asphyxiation through drowning.

This is what would be known as a 'contact' insecticide as it only kills what the spray makes contact with. Unfortunately, because all insecticides must be licensed by the UK Government, using this Saponaria/water mix is unlawful.

The soapy properties of crushed Saponaria officinalis leaves or roots of S. officinalis have have been used by man throughout the centuries In fact modern museum conservators still use Saponaria soap today for cleaning ancient and fragile fabrics that are not capable of withstanding the harshness of modern soaps. For those who may wish to try it, it also makes a fine shampoo.

For related articles click onto the following links:
HOW TO MAKE A NATURAL AND ORGANIC INSECTICIDE SPRAY FOR APHIDS
MAKE YOUR OWN ORGANIC PYRETHRUM INSECTICIDE
Organic Gardening
ORGANIC CONTROL OF CATERPILLARS
Sacrificial Planting
THE IMPORTANCE OF LOG PILES TO NATIVE WILDLIFE
WHAT ARE THE NATURAL PREDATORS OF PLANT LICE?
WHICH PLANTS ATTRACT APHID PREDATORS TO THE GARDEN
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