HOW TO GROW WISTERIA FROM SEED

Mature wisteria - http://cdn.earthporm.com/wp-content/

The genus Wisteria contains arguably the most beautiful of all hardy, ornamental climbing plants. Native to the Eastern United States, China, Korea, and Japan, they are valued for their spectacular blooms and often are used to decorate walls, fences, arches, pergolas and trees.

Wisteria seeds
While wisteria are usually propagated commercially using hardwood or softwood cuttings, they are also easily grown from seed. The best time for sowing wisteria seed is during March. Be aware though that specimens grown from seed can take many years before they are mature enough to bloom.

You can collect your own seeds by picking seed pods in the autumn and keeping them in a brown bag. Leave them in a dry, frost-free position until the pods burst. The seeds can be left to dry until they are required. Before sowing consider speeding up germination by nicking the seeds first and soaking them in warm water for 24 hours before planting.

Wisteria seedlings - http://bonsaibeginnings.blogspot.co.uk/
Using a large modular seed tray sow the seeds at a rate of one seed per module. Sow more seeds than you require as some seeds-grown specimens will produce poor flower spike formation and flower colour.

Press the seeds into the compost but do not bury them as they require the presence of light to help initiate germination. Cover with a thin layer of vermiculite or horticultural grade grit and gently water in.

Place the tray inside a heated propagator at a temperature of between 10-13 degrees Celsius. Alternatively seal inside a clear plastic bag. Place on a warm bright windowsill, but one which does not receive direct light. Keep the soil moist but not waterlogged.

Once germinated remove them from the propagator or polythene bag, but continue to grow them on under protected conditions until the roots have established in their modules. Pot on into 3 inch pots containing a good quality compost such as John Innes 'No 1', and add a small supporting cane without damaging the new roots. Wisteria are fast-growing and are likely to need potting on again in June or July into 5 inch pots. Harden them off for a week or so before plunging them into a nursery bed until they are ready to be planted into their final position.

Wisteria will cope poor-quality soils, but will perform far better in fertile, moist, well-drained soils in a sunny position.

For related articles click onto the following links:
HOW TO GROW WISTERIA
HOW TO GROW WISTERIA FROM SEED
HOW TO TAKE CUTTINGS OF WISTERIA
TRACHELOSPERMUM JASMINOIDES

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