BOMAREA CALDASII

Bomarea caldasii - http://farm5.static.flickr.com/



Bomarea caldasii is a gorgeous evergreen vine that can reach up to 3 metres in height. Native to the tropical and Andean regions of America, Bomarea caldasii is known for its gnarled stems and highly ornamental flowers. It is typically found growing in the forest under-story, in lightly shaded conditions although it will grow best in full sun. The stems emerge from short underground rhizomes and will vigorously search out for support as it grows. In countries where is has naturalised it can be considered an invasive weed as it will smother and kill native plants given the right conditions.

Bomarea caldasii seeds - http://images.summitpost.org/
The blooms are produced in late spring/early summer in a dense umbel at the end of the growing shoots. Each umbel can be composed of as many as 30-45 flowers consisting of three outer tepals and three inner, sometimes of contrasting colours.Once pollinated the flowers develop into capsules about 2 cm in diameter and when ripe will open to reveal bright orange, fleshy seeds.

Bomarea caldasii is considered to be a perennial vine, but it will die back over winter if exposed to severe frosts. You can propagate Bomarea caldasii from its roots suckers or by seed.

The genus Bomarea was first described by the French botanist Charles-Fran├žois Brisseau de Mirbel in 1802 but it is named after the French pharmacist Jacques-Christophe Valmont Bomare (1731-1807).

For related articles click onto the following links:
ALSTROEMERIA 'Tesronto'
Bomarea caldasii
HOW TO GROW ALSTROEMERIA
HOW TO GROW ALSTROEMERIA FROM SEED
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