HOW TO GROW THE SNAIL VINE FROM SEED

The snail vine



The Snail Vine is a native to tropical South America and Central America, and while that means it is not hardy enough to survive outside in a northern European climate, it will grow quite happily in a pot outside so long as it is brought under protection over the winter.

The Snail vine prefers full sun and a consistently damp soil.  It also goes without saying that because of its tropical origins it prefers high heat and humidity.

Snail vine blooms
While it is unusual to find the Snail Vine for sale in your local plant retailers (at least it is in northern Europe) they are relatively easy to grow from seed. If you live in a Mediterranean climate or warmer then Snail Vine seeds can be grown from seed outside in their final position. Just plant the seeds in any ordinary soil in a sunny area once all dangers of frost has passed in the spring.

How to grow the Snail Vine from seed under protection

In cooler climates you can commence sowing Snail Vine seeds from the middle of April onward. Like the sweet pea climber (to which they are related) Snail Vine seeds need to be chipped or soaked in tepid warm for 1-2 hours.

Sow Snail Vine seed two to three inches apart in pots or trays on the surface of a good compost such as John Innes 'Seed and Cutting'. Lightly cover with more compost or fine grade vermiculite until the seed is just covered. Firm lightly and keep the compost evenly moist.

Snail vine seedlings - http://newsprout.blogspot.co.uk/
Place inside a heated propagator at a temperature of between 21-25 Celsius or seal the container inside a plastic bag and place on a warm, bright windowsill. Germination should occur within 14-30 days. Once germinated, remove from the propagator or bag and position the young Snail Vine plants into cooler environmental conditions.

When seedlings are large enough to handle, transplant into 3 inch pots and grow them on in warm, bright, frost free conditions. Pot on as required into progressively larger pots using a good quality, well-drained compost such as John Innes 'No. 2'. Support the twining stems with an appropriate frame, or provide trellis or horizontal wires if you are growing outside.

Feed and water your Snail Vines regularly throughout the growing season, but reduce this to just moderately over the winter.

If you are growing your Snail Vine plants in large containers then they can be positioned outdoors on a sunny patio in summer, but then they will need to be brought in to a bright warm greenhouse or conservatory for the winter and kept at a minimum temperature of 15°Celsius.

For related articles click onto the following links:
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BUY SNAIL VINE SEED
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Gardenofeaden.com
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HOW TO GROW THE SNAIL VINE FROM SEED
HOW TO GROW THE SNAIL VINE FROM SEED
HOW TO GROW THE SPANISH FLAG FROM SEED - Ipomoea lobata
SENECIO SCANDENS
STURT'S DESERT PEA - Clianthus formosus
THE DUTCHMAN'S PIPE - Aristolochia cathcartii
THE GOLDEN CHALICE VINE - Solandra maxima
THE HAPPY ALIEN PLANT - Calceolaria uniflora
The Monkey Vine - Entada gigas
THE PARROT FLOWER - Impatiens psittacina
The Pelican Flower - Aristolochia grandiflora
THE PIG FACE FRUIT - Solanum mammosum
THE SNAIL VINE - Vigna caracalla
THE WORLD'S UGLIEST FLOWER - Aristolochia cymbifera 'Domingos Martins'

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