THE TRUMPET VINE - Campsis species and hybrids

THE TRUMPET VINE - Campsis species and hybrids


The exotic Campsis - more commonly known as the trumpet vine or trumpet creeper, is a genus of two species of deciduous climbing shrubs. One of which is hardy while the other is not reliably so. They are both vigorous with a somewhat vertical habit and are usually grown on walls where they are helpfully self-clinging. Of course, you will need to supply some suitable apparatus for them to cling onto.

Campsis grandiflora

Campsis grandiflora
Campsis grandiflora is a native to the woodlands of China, and given a warm, protected aspect can reach a height of up to 30 ft.

It has mid-green, pinnate leaves and is the least hardy of the two species.

It produces 3 inch long trumpet-shaped flowers - hence the name - coloured deep orange to red.

These flowers are borne in August and September.

Campsis radicans

Campsis radicans
Campsis radicans is a native to the woodlands of the southeastern United States.

It is the hardier of the two species, and can grow to a very impressive 40 ft in height.

Slightly different to its grandiflora cousin, campsis radicans produces a significant number of aerial roots.

It has light-green pinnate leaves, and scarlet/orange trumpet shaped flowers.

These flowers slightly differ to Campsis grandiflora as they are more tubular and less wide at the mouth.

Campsis × tagliabuana 'Madame Galen'

Campsis × tagliabuana 'Madame Galen'
However, an excellent and hardy hybrid between the two species exists that dates back to mid-19th century called Campsis × tagliabuana 'Madame Galen'. In cooler temperate regions this hybrid will require the shelter of a sunny wall to produce its spectacular flowers in abundance.

Madame Galen produces trumpet-shaped, orange to red flowers up to 3 in long that appear in loose clusters of 6 to 12. Like its parents, it is a woody, climbing, perennial vine that attaches itself to structures and climbs vigorously with aerial roots.

It bears dark-green deciduous leaves up to a foot long. Its flowers are very attractive to bees, butterflies and birds. It is such a good plant that it has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.

For related articles click onto
HOW TO GROW CAMPSIS RADICANS
HOW TO GROW CAMPSIS  X TAGLIABUANA 'Madame Galen' 
HOW TO GROW THE VIRGINIA CREEPER
HOW TO GROW THE JADE VINE
HOW TO GROW LAPAGERIA ROSEA FROM SEED
THE JADE VINE
THE TRUMPET VINE
THUNBERGIA MYSORENSIS - The Indian Clock vine
TRACHELOSPERMUM JASMINOIDES

No comments: