WHERE DO WOLVES LIVE?




The grey wolf - otherwise known as the timber wolf, white wolf or 'common' wolf -  lives in a variety of habitats, from the Arctic tundra and open steppes of Russia, to the mountainous regions and forests of the northern hemisphere. It has a highly organised social structure which enables it to enjoy the maximum cooperation when hunting, communicating, and defending its territory. So successful was it that the grey wolf was once the worlds most widespread mammal.

However, the grey wolf has always been feared by man and has been persecuted more than any other animal, but its cunning, intelligence, and flexibility have saved it from extinction.

Once widespread throughout North America, Canada, Europe and the Far East, the grey wolf is sadly now only found in large numbers in specific parts of Russia, North America and Eastern Europe. Small numbers also occur in the Abruzzi mountains in Italy.

The main reason for the wolf's continuing decline has been the dramatic reduction of its natural prey. This has largely been replaced by farm stock which is protected by the use of poisons, traps and even guns. It is still shot in Europe despite legal protection.

The final fate of the wolf will depend on whether mankind can allow the animal the co-exist alongside him.

The grey wolf lives in packs of between five and ten animals. Each pack contains a family unit,consisting of a dominant male and female, and the offspring from several years.

The hierarchy that exists within each pack is maintained by dominant or submissive body posturing, as well as other behavioural patterns such as the communal care of the young.

The size of the pack's territory depends on the availability of prey, but usually covers several hundred square kilometres. The grey wolf is fiercely territorial. It scent marks boundaries and makes its presence known by howling to other members of the pack. Calls may be answered by rival wolf packs.

For more information click onto:
All About Coyotes
All About Wolves
Black Rhino Facts
British Birds of Paradise
British Government Creates Worlds Largest Marine Reserve Around Chagos Islands
Caring for Insect Eating Birds in Winter
Discovered - Giant Monitor Lizard
Discovered - the Language of Hyenas
Easter Island - a Lesson in Environmental Exploitation
Edible Crop Pollination and the Decline of Bees
Elephants - Can they Run or do they just Walk Fast?
Fall in Bee Populations Linked to Decline in Plant Biodiversity
Food Plants For Butterflies
Food Plants For Caterpillars
Gardenofeadenanimals
How do Elephants Communicate and Talk to Each Other?
How do Lizards Run on Water?
How do Ostriches Run so Fast?
How to Attract Bumblebees to the Suburban Garden
How to Attract the Hummingbird Hawk Moth
How to Make a Butterfly Garden
How to Make a Wildlife Pond
Jellyfish Swarms - The Latest Man-Made disaster?
Light Pollution and the Decline in Bat Populations
Light Pollution and the Decline of Native Insects
Light Pollution - The Hidden Threat
Native Pond Plants
Lost Frog Returned from Extinction
Nectar Rich American Wildflowers for Attracting Native Bumble Bees
Nectar Rich Plants for Attracting Long-Tongued Bumble Bees
Non- Native Invasive Species - The Chinese Mitten Crab
Non-Native Invasive Species - The Japanese Knotweed
Non-Native Invasive Species - The Harlequin Ladybird
Non-Native Invasive Species - The American Signal Crayfish
Non-Native Invasive Species - The Ring-Necked Parakeet
Plants that Attract the Hummingbird Hawk Moth
Seed Bearing Plants for Attracting Wild Finches
The Black Rhino
The Decline of Butterfly and Caterpillar Habitat
The Decline of Insect Eating Birds
The Coyote
The Differences Between Crocodiles and Alligators
The Differences Between Horses and Zebras?
The Duck-Billed Platypus
The Hippopotamus
The Jaguar
Tigers
The Koala
The Snowy Owl
The Wild Coyote Dog
The Wolf
The Eagle Owl
The Importance of Log Piles to Native Wildlife
The 'Native Trees' of England
The Plight of English Woodlands
What can we do to Help Save the Rainforests
What does a Wolf Eat?
What is an Alligator?
What is a Duck-Billed Platypus?
What is a Dolphin?
What is a Gorilla?
What is a Jaguar?
What is a Wolf?
What is 'Slash and Burn' Farming and How does it Affect the Rainforests?
What is the Worlds Largest Eagle?
What is the Most Poisonous Spider?
Where do Wolves Live?
Which Plants can Attract Bats into the Garden?
Why are Tropical Rainforests so Important?
Why Shark Fin Soup is Devastating World Shark Populations
Why Should we Protect the Rainforest?
Wolf Facts
Based on an article from Based on an article from MXM IMP BV/IMP LTD WILDLIFE FACT
Images care of http://animalphotos.info/a/2008/01/27/two-wolves-eat-deer/and http://www.canids.org/species/canis_lupus.htm

WHAT DOES A WOLF EAT?




The grey wolf lives in a variety of habitats, from the Arctic tundra and open steppes of Russia, to the mountainous regions and forests of the northern hemisphere. It has a highly organised social structure which enables it to enjoy the maximum cooperation when hunting, communicating, and defending its territory.

The grey wolf lives in packs of between five and ten animals. Each pack contains a family unit,consisting of a dominant male and female, and the offspring from several years. The hierarchy that exists within each pack is maintained by dominant or submissive body posturing, as well as other behavioural patterns such as the communal care of the young.

The size of the pack's territory depends on the availability of prey, but usually covers several hundred square kilometres.

The grey wolf is fiercely territorial. It scent marks boundaries and makes its presence known by howling to other members of the pack. Calls may be answered by rival wolf packs.

What do wolves eat?

The grey wolf is a big-game hunter from the dog family, hunting mostly hoofed animals. A single wolf is capable of catching and killing a deer unaided, but when hunting as a pack, it will prey on larger animals such as the moose.

Relying chiefly on its hearing and sense of smell to detect prey, the wolf will follow its target all day and night if necessary. It is not particularly fast - the wolf has a top speed of about 45 km per hour, but it does have remarkable powers of endurance which is the key to its hunting success. After a kill, each wolf - starting with high ranking individuals - will eat as much meat as it can. This can sometime be as much as one fifth of its entire body weight! What cannot be consumed is left for scavengers, even though the wolf may have to wait another three or four days before it catches its next meal.

Each member of the pack hunts, except for those too young to join in. These remain at home and wait for food to be brought to them.

For more information click onto:
All about Animals
All About Coyotes
All About Wolves
British Birds of Paradise
British Government Creates Worlds Largest Marine Reserve Around Chagos Islands
Caring for Insect Eating Birds in Winter
Discovered - Giant Monitor Lizard
Discovered - the Language of Hyenas
Easter Island - a Lesson in Environmental Exploitation
Edible Crop Pollination and the Decline of Bees
Elephants - Can they Run or do they just Walk Fast?
Fall in Bee Populations Linked to Decline in Plant Biodiversity
Food Plants For Butterflies
Food Plants For Caterpillars
Gardenofeadenanimals
How do Elephants Communicate and Talk to Each Other?
How do Lizards Run on Water?
How do Ostriches Run so Fast?
How to Attract Bumblebees to the Suburban Garden
How to Attract the Hummingbird Hawk Moth
How to Make a Butterfly Garden
How to Make a Wildlife Pond
Jellyfish Swarms - The Latest Man-Made disaster?
Light Pollution and the Decline in Bat Populations
Light Pollution and the Decline of Native Insects
Light Pollution - The Hidden Threat
Native Pond Plants
Lost Frog Returned from Extinction
Nectar Rich American Wildflowers for Attracting Native Bumble Bees
Nectar Rich Plants for Attracting Long-Tongued Bumble Bees
Non- Native Invasive Species - The Chinese Mitten Crab
Non-Native Invasive Species - The Japanese Knotweed
Non-Native Invasive Species - The Harlequin Ladybird
Non-Native Invasive Species - The American Signal Crayfish
Non-Native Invasive Species - The Ring-Necked Parakeet
Plants that Attract the Hummingbird Hawk Moth
Seed Bearing Plants for Attracting Wild Finches
The Decline of Butterfly and Caterpillar Habitat
The Decline of Insect Eating Birds
The Eagle Owl
The Coyote
The Differences Between Crocodiles and Alligators
The Differences Between Horses and Zebras?
The Duck-Billed Platypus
The Hippopotamus
The Jaguar
Tigers
The Koala
The Peregrine Falcon
The Snowy Owl
The Wild Coyote Dog
The Wolf
The Importance of Log Piles to Native Wildlife
The 'Native Trees' of England
The Plight of English Woodlands
What can we do to Help Save the Rainforests
What do Flamingoes Eat?
What do Meerkats Eat?
What does a Wolf Eat?
What is an Alligator?
What are Bats?
What is a Duck-Billed Platypus?
What is a Dolphin?
What is a Gorilla?
What is a Jaguar?
What is a Wolf?
What is 'Slash and Burn' Farming and How does it Affect the Rainforests?
What is the Worlds Largest Eagle?
What is the Most Poisonous Spider?
Where do Wolves Live?
Which Plants can Attract Bats into the Garden?
Why are Flamingoes Pink?
Why are Tropical Rainforests so Important?
Why Shark Fin Soup is Devastating World Shark Populations
Why Should we Protect the Rainforest?
Wolf Facts
Based on an article from Based on an article from MXM IMP BV/IMP LTD WILDLIFE FACT
Images care of http://animalphotos.info/a/2008/01/27/two-wolves-eat-deer/ and http://animalphotos.info/a/2008/01/27/two-wolves-eat-deer/

THE SNOWY OWL




The Snowy Owl is arguably the most iconic of all the owls, and why wouldn't it be. Pristine white plumage and beautifully dark, soulful eyes, no wonder it is the marketeers number one bird for portraying the spirit of Christmas. Ever since its big-screen d├ębut in the Harry Potter franchise the mysticism behind the Snowy owl has grown, but let us not forget that this creature is both a genuine force of nature, and a formidable hunter!

The snowy owl is one of the world’s largest and most powerful owls. It is also the largest bird that inhabits the Arctic region - breeding beyond the tree line on the frozen, barren tundra. It favours areas with rocks or grassy hummocks which the snowy owl uses as lookout posts for spotting prey and predators alike.

The male snowy owl is almost entirely white, with just a few dark flecks on his plumage. The female is more heavily marked, with dark bars on her upperparts, breast and belly. She is also up to one fifth larger, one third heavier and longer claws that the male. This marked difference between the sexes is unique among owls.

What does the snowy owl eat?

In the arctic, the snowy owl feeds manly on lemming and – to a lesser extent – vole. Elsewhere the snowy owl will eat rabbit, hare and certain birds such as ptarmigan, auk and gull.

Unlike the great majority of owls, the snowy owl rarely hunts during the hours of darkness. Instead, it seeks its prey during the daytime – especially in the twilight of early morning and evening.

After watching from a high perch, the snowy owl glides or hovers over the ground before swooping on to its prey, making the kill with its powerful talons armed with razor-sharp claws.

In the brief Arctic summer, the snowy owl is faced with almost continuous daylight. However, the long Arctic winter brings many hours of darkness and numbing cold, but the owl’s superbly insulating plumage keeps it warm.

Food is scarce during the harsh winter months of the far north, and the snowy owl is capable of fasting for up to forty days at a time. It relies heavily on the thick deposit of fat under its skin that it lays down earlier on in the year, and saves energy by moving as little as possible.

Migration

The snowy owl is a wanderer, moving south in winter in very harsh weather and when prey is scarce in the far north. At intervals, the lemmings – which form the main prey species – suffer a dramatic and sudden drop in their population, resulting in the snowy owls moving much further south.

For many years the snowy owl has been a visitor – albeit a rare one – to northern Britain as well as other parts of northern Europe, but in 1967 birdwatchers were thrilled to learn that a pair of snowy owls has nested on the island of Fetlar, in the Shetland Islands. Careful protection enabled this pair to breed with great success. Within eight breeding seasons, they hatched a total of 49 eggs of which 23 young survived. Since that time all the birds have left the island.

Breeding

The male snowy owl proclaims ownership of his large breeding territory to both rival and prospective mates by bowing violently with his tail cocked, on an elevated ridge or hummock and uttering a series of hollow, booming hoots. These can be heard up to 10km away in the thin Arctic air.

He may chase after rival males and even grapple with them in mid air. A female snowy owl will also defend territory or a potential mate against the interests of other female snowy owls.

The nest is a hollow in the ground, usually on a ridge or outcrop. Like other owl species, the female snowy owl staggers her egg laying. This ensures that the older, stronger chicks will survive during periods of food shortage, by taking most of the food their parents bring to the nest and even killing and eating their younger and weaker siblings.

A food shortage will also affect the number eggs laid. This may range from ten to twelve eggs during plentiful times, down to three or four, or even none at all when lemmings or other prey are scarce

The owlets are covered first with thin white down, but soon acquire a second coat of sooty black down.

At 43 to 50 days old, the young birds can fly and by 60 days they will be able to hunt for themselves. Unfortunately many chicks fall prey to predators such as skua birds and arctic foxes.

For more information click onto:
THE VERMILLION FLYCATCHER - Pyrocephalus rubinus

BLACK RHINO FACTS




The black rhino is considered to be the most aggressive species of its family and – despite its massive bulk – can charge at great speed at an unwary observer. However, it rarely presses home such attacks, preferring instead to browse the low trees of its wooded habitat, or simply to doze in the cool shade.

Black Rhino facts

1. A black rhino can charge at 50km per hour and is completely capable of killing a human being. It can even cause serious damage to a car.

2. Black rhinos can't see too well, so they sometimes charge objects like trees and rocks, mistaking them as threats. However, the black rhino has a keen sense of smell and hearing. Black rhinos use the bigger of the two horns on their noses as weapons in a fight.

3. The horns of a rhino are made of a substance similar to that of human fingernails, sometimes break off, but they are able to grow back.

4. A female black rhino was once seen wallowing with 6 turtles picking out ticks as they climbed out her body.

5. The oxpecker bird travels regularly on the rhinos back, and provides valuable services. Not only do they pick out ticks, they also screech loudly when humans approach.

6. A black rhino calf follows its mother while she clears a path through dense cover, but a young white rhino is more likely to run on ahead.

7. In several Asian cultures, people believe that a rhino horn provides powerful medicine for a variety of ailments. Other people, who live mainly in northern Africa, use rhino horns to make the handles for special daggers. Since rhino horns fetch high prices, many poachers are willing to break the law and kill these endangered animals.

Where does the black rhino live?

The black rhino lives in hilly areas on the edges of woodland. Although the male rhino – known as a bull – is a solitary beast, his home range usually overlaps with those of other bulls.

These neighbouring bulls are likely to all meet up at their shared waterhole. In fact these regular users appear to know and tolerate each other, and their collective group – known as a clan – is led by one overall, dominant bull.

These clan members challenge any unknown rhinos that visit the waterhole. Snorting loudly, the clan rhinos paw the ground and may even charge, but rarely make physical contact. The encounter usually ends with one rhino – usually the intruder - moving away.

The black rhino uses scent as a signal, spraying urine along paths and using communal dung-heaps. It scrapes with its hind feet after defecating in order to collect and carry the scent away with it.

What do rhinos eat?

The black rhino browses on trees and shrubs. Having pulled down branches from shrubs with its lips, it strips the leaves and shoots from these with a specialised upper lip which is prehensile.

The rhino also pulls up small seedling trees, and takes fruit from both trees and wind fall off the ground. It cannot easily graze, but it can tear up and eat clumps of long grasses.

Since the black rhino needs to drink at least once a day, it will stay within 5km of water. In very dry conditions, the black rhino can dig for water using its forefeet.

The rhino will approach a waterhole using regular, heavily trodden paths which are clearly visible in the surrounding undergrowth.

The black rhino feeds at dawn and dusk, spending most of the core day sleeping or in a mud wallow.

Enemies of the rhino

The black rhino has few natural predators. A lion may try and take a calf, and while a pack of spotted hyena is a more serious threat, poaching is the biggest threat to the black rhino’s existence. In fact, it is believed that poaching rhinos for their valuable horns is now responsible for a 80% reduction in rhino numbers since 1970.

Believe it or not, but rhino horn handled knives bought by young men in Yeman accounted for the death of 8000 rhinos between 1969 and 1977.

Rhino horn is also powdered for medicinal purposes by the Chinese.

Rhino breeding

In order to try and attract a female rhino – known as a cow, a bull rhino brushes his horn over the ground, charges at bushes, rushes back and forth and frequently sprays urine.

If the bull is successful, and after a gestation period of approximately 15 months, the female will retreat into dense cover in order to give birth. Although the calf can walk when barely 10 minutes old, it could easily be trampled, so the mother keeps it hidden for the next couple of weeks, defending it fiercely from predators.

The black rhino will stop growing when about 7 years old. The female can breed before this, but in the wild she bears just one calf every two to five years.

For related articles click onto:
Black Rhino Facts
Gardenofeadenanimals
Hippo Baby
Moose Facts
The Animals of Tasmania
The Black Rhino
The Coyote
The Differences Between Crocodiles and Alligators
The Differences Between Horses and Zebras?
The Duck-Billed Platypus
The Hippopotamus
The Jaguar
The Javan Rhinoceros - Rhinoceros sondaicus 
Tigers
The Koala
The Wolf
The Hippo
The Moose
The Ostrich
What does a Wolf Eat?
What is a Duck-Billed Platypus?
What is a Dolphin?
What is a Gorilla?
What is a Jaguar?
Where do Wolves Live?

THE DUCK-BILLED PLATYPUS




One of the strangest-looking of all mammals, the duck-billed platypus is the size of a rabbit and has a unique bird-like bill. It is one of only three mammals in the world to lay eggs.

Although it is not threatened in the wild, modern pressures on its freshwater habitat mean that it may need careful protection in the future

Where does the duck-billed platypus live?

The duck-billed platypus always lives near water, inhabiting the rivers of eastern Australia and Tasmania. It nests in tunnels that it digs out of the river banks, although sometimes it will live in deep crevices and little caves in areas where the river runs between rocky banks. Their tunnels can be in the region of 15 metres long, although they are usually much shorter.

The duck-billed platypus is truly amphibious as it is perfectly at home on both land and water. It lives a solitary life except during the breeding season, and is considered to be quite territorial in its need to secure stretches of the river for feeding rights.

It uses its strong, webbed front feet for both swimming and burrowing. When it walks on land, it curls these feet right under its body in order to protect them.

What does the duck-billed platypus eat?

The duck-billed platypus finds its food in the water, where it hunts for small prey such as insect larvae, water snails and small crustaceans.

Under the water it closes its eyes, ears and nostrils and uses its broad bill to locate prey. The bill is soft and pliable – not hard like a birds’, and is highly sensitive. The platypus sweeps it from side to side as it searches along the bottom of the river. It sometimes remains underwater by wedging itself below a log or in a crevice under a stone.

Down on the river bed, the platypus takes food up into its cheeks. When the cheek pouches are full, the platypus comes up to the surface again. There, it discards any sand and stones that it has accidentally picked up and grinds the food between the horny plates it has instead of teeth.

It swims along using its front feet only, and most of its dive lasts between half a minute, and a minute and a half. However, if need be, the duck-billed platypus is capable of staying submerged for longer.

Duck-billed platypus breeding

The male and female platypus come together to mate between August and October. The courtship takes place in the river, with the prospective pair swimming around each other.

The female platypus then digs a long nesting tunnel in the river bank with a birthing chamber at its end. The nesting tunnel is longer than the platypus’ home tunnel – it may be as much as 20 metres long!

The female collects grass and leaves and carries them back to the tunnel grasped under her tail. She then constructs a nest within the birthing chamber. There, she will lay two white, soft-shelled eggs which she incubates by holding them snugly between her tail and belly. Each egg is about the size of a large marble.

The hatching period is though to be variable, but after about 1-2 weeks the eggs will hatch and the young make their way through their mother fur to a glandular patch where milk is produced.

The youngsters stay within the burrow for 4-5 months, and continue to take their mother milk after they have left the burrow. They are playful, and have been seen to romp around like puppies.

Ducked billed platypus facts.

1. The duck-billed platypus has a hollow spur on the back of each of its rear feet. Each spur contains enough poison to kill a dog. The spur may be used in rivalry fights.

2. The platypus is considered to be one of the most primitive of mammals. The only other mammals that lays eggs, like their reptilian ancestors did, are the platypus’ only relative – the two echidnas of Australia and New Guinea.

3. When the first species of this mammal was seen in England in the late 1700’s, it was thought to be a fake. Scientists assumed that a joker had stitched together a ducks beak and a mammal’s body.

4. At around 32 degrees Celsius, the body temperature of the platypus is remarkably low for a mammal.

5. The duck-billed platypus can change its shape very easily. Its body is like a strong tube of muscle and it can easily squeeze through narrow spaces and out of someone’s grip.

6. The word platypus also comes from the Greek for 'flat' and 'foot'.

7. The duck-billed platypus can sense prey by means of electrolocation - this is the ability to detect the tiny electric impulses given off by animals when they move.
   
Click here for related articles:
All about Animals
All about Chimpanzees
All About Coyotes
All About Wolves
All about Lions
Alligator
Are Zebras Black with White Stripes or White with Black Stripes?
Black Rhino Facts
Can Flying Fish really Fly?
Chimpanzee
Cheetah Facts, Videos and Photographs
Chimpanzee Facts
Do Fish Sleep?
Duck-Billed Platypus - Amazing Facts
Flying Fish
Gardenofeadenanimals
Giraffe Facts
Gorilla
Hippo Baby
How do you find Truffles?
How fast is a Snail?
How Long can a Flying Fish Fly for?
How to Feed Birds?
Is a Koala Bear a Bear?
Koala Facts
LIVING DINOSAURS - The Coelacanth
Moose Facts
The Hippopotamus
The Snow Leopard
Olympic Facts
Panda
Panda Bear
Panda Facts
Peacock Facts
Peafowl and Peacocks
Polar Bear
Polar Bear Facts
Rango Facts and Movie Videos
Sea animals: Sea Anemones
Snow Leopard facts
The Black Rhino
The Blue Whale
The Chimpanzee
The Chinese giant salamander (Andrias davidianus)
The Coelacanth - a living, breathing fossil
The Cuckoo
The Differences Between Crocodiles and Alligators
The Differences Between Horses and Zebras?
The Coyote
The Duck-Billed Platypus
The Giraffe
The Hippopotamus
The Jaguar
Tigers
The Koala
The Wolf
The Giant Salamander
The Giraffe
The Hedgehog
The Indian Lion
The Hummingbird Moth
The Manatee
The Indian Rhino
The Hippo
The Moose
The Koala
The Ostrich
The Peacock
The Portuguese Man of War
The Saltwater Crocodile
The Wild Coyote Dog
Tigers
What are the Nine Sub-Species of Tiger?
Ugly Animals
Venomous Snakes
What Animal is Sid from the Film 'Ice Age'?
What are Mycorrhizal Fungi?
What are Plant Macronutrients and Micronutrients?
What are Plant Nutrients?
What Causes Blue Hydrangeas to Turn Pink?
What Causes Moss in Lawns
What do Chimpanzees Eat?
What do Giraffes Eat?
What do Koalas Eat?
What do Pandas Eat?
What do Peacocks Eat?
What do Polar Bears Eat?
What do Snow Leopards Eat?
What do Tigers Eat?
What does a Wolf Eat?
What is Chlorosis?
What is a Cuckoo?
What is a Coyote?
What is a Dolphin?
What is a Flying Fish?
What is a Giraffe?
What is a Gorilla?
What is a Hedgehog?
What is a Jaguar?
What is a Naked Mole Rat?
What is a Koala?
What is a Manatee?
What is a Polar Bear?
What is a Portuguese man of war?
What is Frankincense?
What is John Innes Base?
What is John Innes Compost?
What is a Leaf Mould Compost?
What is Cork Made of?
What is a Duck-Billed Platypus?
What is a Dolphin?
What is a Gorilla?
What is a Jaguar?
What is a Koala?
What is a Snow Leopard?
What is a Wolf?
What is a Wormery?
What is an Epiphyte?
What is Fibre?
What is an F1 Hybrid?
What is an Orchid?
What is Over-watering and How to Recognise it?
What is Pricking out?
What is Rhubarb Poisoning?
What is the Difference between African and Indian Elephants?
What is the Difference Between Alligators and Crocodiles?
What is the Difference Between Fruit and Vegetables
What is the Difference between a Fruit and a Vegetable?
What is the Difference between a Frog and a Toad?
What is the Difference between a Moth and a Butterfly?
What is the Difference between a Rat and a Mouse?
What is the Difference Between a Tortoise and a Turtle?
What is the Difference Between a Plant Cell and an Animal Cell?
What is the Difference between Currants, Raisins and Sultanas?
What is the Most Poisonous Snake in India?
What is Saffron?
What is the World's Biggest Cat?
What is the Worlds Biggest Shark?
What is the Worlds Fastest Animal?
What is the Worlds Largest Amphibian?
What is the Worlds Largest Eagle?
What is the Worlds Largest Flower?
What is the Worlds Largest Insect?
What is the World's Largest Species of Tiger?
What is the World's Largest Spider?
What is the Worlds Fastest Bird?
What is the Worlds Fastest Fish?
What is the Worlds most Poisonous Frog?
What is the World's most Poisonous Snake?
What is the Most Poisonous Spider?
When should you Re-pot an Orchid?
Where can you find Pandas?
Where can you Find a Polar Bear?
Where do Cheetahs Live?
Where do Giraffes Live?
Where do Gorillas Live?
Where do Jaguars Live?
Where do Kangaroos Live?
Where do Koalas Live?
Where do Peacocks Live?
Where do Manatees Live?
Where do Pandas Live?
Where do Polar Bears Live?
Where to find Black Widows?
Where to find Jaguars?
Where to find Snow leopards?
Where do Snow Leopards Live?
Where do Tigers Live?
Where do Wolves Live?
Where do Zebras Live?
Where to find Red Squirrels?
Why are Flamingoes Pink?
Why do Flamingoes stand on one leg?
Why do Giraffes have Long Necks?
Why do Onions make you Cry?
Why do Leaves Change their Colour in the Autumn Fall
Why do Trees drop their Leaves in Autumn Fall
Why is the Sea Salty?
Why is the Sky Blue?
Wildlife
Wolf Conservation
Wolf Facts
World's Largest Insect
Zebra
Based on an article from the Wildlife fact-file and http://www.australian-wildlife.com/Platypus-information.html
Images care of http://sydney.edu.au/news/84.html?newsstoryid=9245 and http://deceitofevolution.wordpress.com/2011/04/04/dilemmaofintermediateforms/ and http://gentlefootprintsanimalanthology.blogspot.co.uk/2010/11/amazing-duck-billed-platypus.html and http://thejunglestore.blogspot.co.uk/2012/05/duck-billed-platypus-venoumous-creature.html

THE JAGUAR




The subject of many myths and hunters’ tales, the jaguar is the largest wild cat native to the Americas. It is now extremely rare outside captivity as the result of being hunted for its attractive skin.

Jaguars live in a variety of habitats, from dense jungle and scrubland to reed thickets and shore-line forests. They will even live in open country provided the grass and rocks offer sufficient cover for hunting and a reliable supply of water is available.

Where do jaguars live?

Jaguars were once found everywhere from Arizona to Argentina, but ruthless hunting has wiped them out from most of their range, and reduced them greatly elsewhere.

In many countries, rapid expansion of forest clearing to provide pastures for beef cattle and to build new settlements has finished what the hunters began. Jaguars are said to still be common in the upper basin of the Orinoco, Venezuela, but almost everywhere else they are in danger of extinction. In fact there are believed to be less that 200 jaguars left in the whole of Argentina! At this rate, the only flourishing population of jaguars left will be those held by world’s zoos.

Jaguars have a reputation for being man-eaters, and there are many hunters’ tales of men being followed for mile after mile through the forest by a solitary jaguar, which eventually fades away as silently as it appeared. This suggests that the animal was escorting the men off from its territory. If the jaguar had been hunting them, it would have had plenty of opportunities to attack and kill its intended prey.

Adult jaguars are solitary animals, except during the breeding season when a male and female stay together for a short while in order to mate. The young jaguars stay with their mother for the first few years of life before leaving the family to find hunting territories of their own.

The size of the jaguar’s territory depends on the availability of food. Where food is plentiful – as you would expect in an area of undisturbed forest – a jaguar should be able to feed itself from a circular area of about 5km in diameter. Where food is scarcer – perhaps because the forest has been cleared – a jaguar may need a territory of 500sq km, 30 times larger!

What do Jaguars eat?

Although jaguars are good climbers, they hunt mainly on the ground at night. They will however, climb trees in order to lie and wait for prey.

The jaguar can over short distances rapidly, but it will tire quickly. Therefore its successful kills rely on both surprise and getting sufficiently close to unsuspecting prey.

Its main food consists of forest animals – varying in size from mice to deer. However the jaguar is also an excellent swimmer, able to catch frogs, fish, turtles and even small alligators!

The jaguar is especially skilled at catching fish, which it achieves by lying motionless on a rock or overhanging branch, then flipping the fish out on the bank with its paw.

Jaguars will also take domestic animals – particularly where the forest has been cleared for farmland.

After the kill, jaguars will drag their pray into cover before eating it, often burying part of the carcass to finish it off later.

Jaguar breeding

Very little is known about the family life of wild jaguars. For many years they have been hunted for their fur. In fact, during the 1960’s over 1000 were shot every year in the Brazilian Amazon jungle. Hunters became experts at finding and killing them but paid little attention to their way of life. Now, biologists trying to study jaguars in the wild are handicapped because they have become so rare. Most of their information comes from zoos, where jaguars have been bred successfully.

 It appears that male and female and female jaguars meet in the wild only to mate. The male leaves as soon as mating is over, and the female brings up the young on her own. She produces between one and four cubs, which are blind at birth and weigh only 700-900 grams each. All-black jaguars are not uncommon. These cubs would have had a spotted father and a black mother.

Two weeks later, the cubs will open their eyes. During the following weeks they begin to explore the world outside of their mothers den until – at about six months old – they begin to accompany her on hunting trips. The cubs will live and hunt with their mother for the first two years of their life, before leaving to find a territory of their own in which to hunt. A jaguar is sexually mature at three years old, but males do not breed until a year later.

Click here for related articles:
All about Animals
All about Chimpanzees
All About Coyotes
All about Jaguars
All about Polar Bears
All About Wolves
All about Lions
Alligator
Are Zebras Black with White Stripes or White with Black Stripes?
Can Flying Fish really Fly?
Chimpanzee
Cheetah Facts, Videos and Photographs
Chimpanzee Facts
Do Fish Sleep?
Flamingo Facts
Flying Fish
Gardenofeadenanimals
Giraffe Facts
Gorilla
Hippo Baby
How do you find Truffles?
How fast is a Snail?
How Long can a Flying Fish Fly for?
Komodo Dragon Facts
Komodo Dragon Habitat
LIVING DINOSAURS - The Coelacanth
The Snow Leopard
Ostrich Facts
Panda
Panda Bear
Panda Facts
Peacock Facts
Peafowl and Peacocks
Polar Bear Facts
Portuguese Man of War Stings
Rango Facts and Movie Videos
The Blue Whale
The Chimpanzee
The Coelacanth - a living, breathing fossil
The Coyote
The Differences Between Crocodiles and Alligators
The Differences Between Horses and Zebras?
The Duck-Billed Platypus
The Flamingo
The Flying Squirrel
The Giraffe
The Hippopotamus
The Jaguar
The Javan Rhinoceros - Rhinoceros sondaicus 
The Jesus Christ Lizard
The Komodo Dragon
The Indian Lion
Where can you find Komodo Dragons?
Tigers
The Koala
The Peacock
The Portuguese Man of War
The Tasmanian Tiger
The Wild Coyote Dog
The Wolf
The World's Ugliest Animals
What are the Nine Sub-Species of Tiger?
Ugly Animals
Venomous Snakes
What Animal is Sid from the Film 'Ice Age'?
What are Mycorrhizal Fungi?
What are Plant Macronutrients and Micronutrients?
What are Plant Nutrients?
What Causes Blue Hydrangeas to Turn Pink?
What Causes Moss in Lawns
What do Chimpanzees Eat?
What do Flamingoes Eat?
What do Giraffes Eat?
What do Jaguars Eat?
What do Koalas Eat?
What do Komodo Dragons Eat?
What do Pandas Eat?
What do Peacocks Eat?
What do Polar Bears Eat?
What do Snow Leopards Eat?
What do Tigers Eat?
What does a Wolf Eat?
What is Chlorosis?
What is a Dragonfly?
What is Frankincense?
What is John Innes Base?
What is John Innes Compost?
What is a Leaf Mould Compost?
What is Cork Made of?
What is an Alligator?
What is a Duck-Billed Platypus?
What is a Dolphin?
What is a Gorilla?
What is a Jaguar?
What is a Portuguese man of war?
What is a Naked Mole Rat?
What is a Koala?
What is a Komodo Dragon?
What is a Snow Leopard?
What is the Tasmanian Tiger?
What is a Tiger?
What is a Wolf?
What is a Wormery?
What is an Epiphyte?
What is Fibre?
What is an F1 Hybrid?
What is an Orchid?
What is Over-watering and How to Recognise it?
What is Pricking out?
What is Rhubarb Poisoning?
What is the Difference between African and Indian Elephants?
What is the Difference Between Alligators and Crocodiles?
What is the Difference Between Fruit and Vegetables
What is the Difference between a Fruit and a Vegetable?
What is the Difference between a Frog and a Toad?
What is the Difference between a Moth and a Butterfly?
What is the Difference between a Rat and a Mouse?
What is the Difference Between a Tortoise and a Turtle?
What is the Difference Between a Plant Cell and an Animal Cell?
What is the Difference between Currants, Raisins and Sultanas?
What is the Most Poisonous Snake in India?
What is Saffron?
What is the World's Biggest Cat?
What is the Worlds Biggest Shark?
What is the Worlds Fastest Animal?
What is the Worlds Fastest Bird?
What is the Worlds Largest Amphibian?
What is the Worlds Largest Eagle?
What is the Worlds Largest Flower?
What is the Worlds Largest Insect?
What is the World's Largest Species of Tiger?
What is the World's Largest Spider?
What is the Worlds Fastest Bird?
What is the Worlds Fastest Fish?
What is the Worlds most Poisonous Frog?
What is the World's most Poisonous Snake?
What is the World's Ugliest Dog?
What is the Most Poisonous Spider?
When should you Re-pot an Orchid?
Where can you find the Golden Eagle?
Where can you find Pandas?
Where do Cheetahs Live?
Where do Giraffes Live?
Where do Gorillas Live?
Where do Jaguars Live?
Where do Kangaroos Live?
Where do Koalas Live?
Where do Peacocks Live?
Where do Manatees Live?
Where do Pandas Live?
Where do Polar Bears Live?
Where to find Black Widows?
Where to find Dolphins?
Where can you find Flamigoes?
Where can you find Flying Squirrels?
Where to find Jaguars?
Where to find Snow leopards?
Where do Snow Leopards Live?
Where do Tigers Live?
Where do Wolves Live?
Where do Zebras Live?
Where do you Find Black Widow Spiders?
Where to find Red Squirrels?
Why are Flamingoes Pink?
Why do Flamingoes stand on one leg?
Why do Giraffes have Long Necks?
Why do Onions make you Cry?
Why do Leaves Change their Colour in the Autumn Fall
Why do Trees drop their Leaves in Autumn Fall
Why is the Sea Salty?
Why is the Sky Blue?
Wolf Conservation
Wolf Facts
World's Largest Insect
Images care of http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/wildlife/8190527/Jaguar-defeats-caiman-in-battle-of-predators.html and http://www.animal-space.net/2010/09/animal-mothers-with-babies.html and http://www.hdwallpapers.in/jaguar_cub_fighting_mother-wallpapers.html
Based on an article from MXM IMP BV/IMP LTD WILDLIFE FACTS