HOW TO TAKE CUTTINGS FROM GRAPEVINES




For many of gardeners, growing grapes vines in the garden is usually no more than a misplaced romantic idea of producing your own wine. Whereas it is far more realistic to look at it as a concerted attempt at fruit production.

However, the history of grape production and human kind has been entwined for thousands of years, and - to be fair - it's not a bad ornamental plant in its own right. So whatever your reasons for growing, you will get some benefit.

Unfortunately, vines can be expensive to purchase and you may not be able to find the varieties you want, but as it turns out, grape vines are very easy to propagate from cuttings.

Be aware though that modern wine production involves grafting cultivated varieties onto rootstocks resistant to the phylloxera aphida major pest of commercial grapevines worldwide.

How to propagate vines from hardwood cuttings

To begin with, prepare a small pot for rooting the cutting by filling with equal amounts of sand, peat and perlite. You can also use fine gravel for rooting your cuttings.

If you wish to use rooting hormones, pour an inch of rooting hormone into a plastic cup and set it aside. However, vines are so easy to root, it really isn't worth the effort or cost of purchasing hormone powder.

Cut 4 to 8 inch long sections of hardwood stems from the vines you wish to propagate. Use a sharp, sterile scissors and measure from the stem tip. Make sure that the uppermost cut is sloping.

The recommended time to take hardwood cuttings is anywhere between November and February.

Remove all the lateral shoots and any dormant buds from the lower half of each cutting. Insert a pencil at a depth of about 2 to 3 inches in the rooting medium to create planting holes.

At this point - should you wish to - dip the base of each cutting into the rooting hormone and plant immediately in individual planting holes.

Firm the soil around the cuttings and water well.

Place the pot in a warm, bright area, but make sure that they are out of direct sunlight. Keep the soil moist but not waterlogged.

Cuttings started off in January or February should by June have grown a stem 3 to 5 ft long and they will be ready for planting out in the greenhouse border or hardened off on the patio or in a sheltered place before going to their permanent position in the garden.

Ensure that the vine is well watered in when being planted outside to prevent a dry spell from dehydrating the plant.

For information click onto
HOW TO GROW A GRAPEVINE FROM SEED
HOW TO GROW GRAPEVINES IN A GREENHOUSE
HOW TO GROW SHARON FRUIT - Diospyros kaki
HOW TO GROW THE VIRGINIA CREEPER FROM CUTTINGS
HOW TO GROW VITIS VINIFERA 'PURPUREA'
HOW TO OVERWINTER GRAPEVINES
How to Recognise Vine Weevil Damage on Plants
HOW TO TAKE CUTTINGS FROM GRAPEVINES
HOW TO TAKE CUTTINGS FROM THE STRAWBERRY TREE - Arbutus unedo
How to Take Hardwood Cuttings
HOW TAKE CUTTINGS FROM BOUGAINVILLEA
HOW TO TAKE HONEYSUCKLE CUTTINGS
HOW TO TAKE CUTTINGS OF WISTERIA
ORGANIC CONTROL OF VINE WEEVILS
THE GOLDEN CHALICE VINE - Solandra maxima
THE MARBLE BERRY - Pollia Condensata
THE WORLD'S UGLIEST FLOWER - Aristolochia cymbifera 'Domingos Martins'
WHAT IS GRAPESHOT?
WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN CURRANTS, RAISINS AND SULTANAS
Why is my Lemon Tree Dropping Leaves?

No comments: