HOW TO GROW AURICULAS FROM SEED





Early February is perhaps the best time to sow pre-packed auricular seed, because there are usually a few late frosts on the horizon which can help to break seed dormancy. However if you are collecting your own seed then sowing immediately as this will usually give you a far greater seed viability and will avoid the need for breaking any dormancy.

For the best start it is wise to use a decent compost mix. Try using John Innes ‘Seed and Potting’ as a base, but add to it some horticultural grit or perlite at a ratio of 2:1, make sure that it is well mixed before use.

Image credit - http://swedensauriculaclub.blogspot.co.uk/
Stand a pot or pan of seed compost in bowl of water until it is well soaked, then gently spread the auricular seed around the surface. Sprinkle some more of the same compost on top to give the seed a thin covering. Date and label the pot or pan then place a transparent cover – such as a small piece of glass – over the top of it. Place outside into a cold, well-ventilated greenhouse or partially opened cold frame. This will allow the seed to receive the cold temperatures whilst protecting them from becoming waterlogged.
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Towards the middle of March the pots will need to be moved to a position where they are protected from strong sunlight. This can be as simple as placing them under a bench in the greenhouse or bring them indoors and placing them into a cool room away from direct sunlight. The transparent cover will still need to be kept in place.

Inspect your seeds daily from this point on as you wait for germination to occur, and when a few seedlings have started to emerge the transparent cover can be partially removed to give them some air - however, seedlings must still remain protected from strong sunshine.
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Be aware that seedling growth will be very slow and once it looks like all the viable seeds have germinated, give them a very weak liquid feed in the region of ¼ normal strength. When the young plants are big enough to handle, prick them out into a good quality compost – such as John Innes ‘No 1' - and grow them on. Again, you may wish to add horticultural grit or perlite to help with drainage.

For related article click onto the following links:
BULLY'S PRIMROSE - Primula bulleyana
HOW TO GROW AURICULAS FROM SEED
HOW TO GROW NATIVE WILD PRIMROSES AND POLYANTHUS FROM SEED
HOW TO PROPAGATE COWSLIPS AND PRIMROSES
OLD ENGLISH PLANTS - Polyanthus ‘Gold Lace’
PRIMROSE AND COWSLIP PESTS AND DISEASES
POLYANTHUS 'GOLD LACE'
THE ORCHID PRIMULA - Primula vialii

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